Biden expected to nominate Shalanda Young for budget chief

President BidenJoe BidenDearborn office of Rep. Debbie Dingell vandalized Pfizer to apply for COVID-19 booster approval for 16- and 17-year-olds: report Coronavirus variant raises fresh concerns for economy MORE will nominate Shalanda Young on Wednesday as director of the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), The Washington Post reported Tuesday evening, citing three unidentified sources. 

Young has served as the acting budget director for months after being confirmed in a 63-37 vote. 

She would be the first woman of color to lead the office if confirmed. 

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Young has support from both sides of the aisle, the Post noted, adding that she was not nominated earlier because some Democrats wanted to see more people of Asian descent promoted in the administration. 

The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal later reported that Biden plans to nominate Young.

The Journal also reported that the White House has plans to nominate Nani Coloretti to serve as OMB's deputy director. She served as deputy secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, and is currently serving as senior vice president for financial and business strategy at the Urban Institute.

Biden’s last pick to be OMB director, Neera TandenNeera TandenGOP holds on Biden nominees set back gains for women in top positions On The Money — Biden's big plans for the Fed Biden taps Shalanda Young to lead White House budget office MORE, withdrew her nomination amid bipartisan criticism after posts made while she led a think tank resurfaced.  

She compared Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense & National Security — US, Iran return to negotiating table Senate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo On The Money — Biden stresses calm amid omicron fears MORE (R-Ky.) to Voldemort and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense & National Security — US, Iran return to negotiating table Senate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo On The Money — Biden stresses calm amid omicron fears MORE (R-Texas) to a vampire, while also suggesting that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenate GOP blocks defense bill, throwing it into limbo This week: Congress starts year-end legislative sprint Restless progressives eye 2024 MORE (I-Vt.) benefited from Russian hacking in the 2016 presidential election. A number of those tweets have since been deleted.

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Tanden apologized for the controversial tweets in two confirmation hearings, but her contrition was not enough to assuage concerns from a number of senators. Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSchumer: 'Goal' is to pass Biden spending bill before Christmas The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden to update Americans on omicron; Congress back This week: Congress starts year-end legislative sprint MORE (W.Va.), one of the Democratic lawmakers who opposed her confirmation, cited the need for comity.

She has since been chosen to serve as White House staff secretary.

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.

Biden’s pick for the top spot at OMB comes amid a busy time for the administration’s legislative agenda. The president signed a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package last week, and Democratic lawmakers and White House officials are now working to finalize and pass the party’s roughly $2 trillion social spending and climate package.

— Updated at 7:53 a.m.