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Durbin wins battle to pass 'interchange fee' legislation, 64-33

The Senate on Thursday passed controversial legislation clamping down on fees that card issuers charge merchants, handing Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Durbin: Republicans are making it 'as hard as possible' to vote GOP Rep. Rodney Davis wins reelection in Illinois MORE (D-Ill.) a major victory.

As part of debate on Wall Street overhaul, the Senate passed, 64-33, legislation championed by Durbin that drew significant Republican support. Ten Democrats opposed the legislation, while 17 Republicans crossed the aisle to support a bill that aims to rein in fees placed on debit cards.

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Durbin earlier on Thursday railed on the bank lobby for opposing the legislation. The Independent Community Bankers of America, Credit Union National Association and National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU) loudly opposed Durbin's measure.

"It is a shame that their attempt at getting back at big banks and large credit card companies has spilled over to credit unions and community banks," said Dan Berger, executive vice president at NAFCU. "This will do nothing for consumers but go straight to the bottom line of the big box stores and giant retailers."

Durbin overcame the lobbying to pass legislation that requires the Federal Reserve to issue rules on swipe fees for debit cards to ensure fees are "responsible and proportional" to processing costs. The legislation does not ban swipe card fees. Durbin had won strong backing from merchant and retail groups. Durbin said the restrictions would not apply to banks and credit unions with $10 billion or less in assets.

"It wasn't introduced as a partisan amendment," Durbin said Thursday before the vote. "I brought this because it is a small business, retail amendment that I think is valid and just."

Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDem overtures to Trump on drug pricing worry pharma Dems warn party message lacks punch Trump unveils most aggressive action to target drug prices MORE (D-Vt.), who is a strong supporter of efforts to rein in card fees, praised the Senate vote.

"This momentous, overwhelming vote sends an unambiguous message to credit card companies that the American people have had enough of swipe fees and have had enough of cash register rip-offs," Welch said.

Senate Democrats opposing the amendment were: Daniel Akaka (Hawaii), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (Mont.), Evan Bayh (Ind.), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperCarper cruises to fourth term in Delaware Senate race Overnight Energy: Groups want Senate to probe Interior watchdog controversy | Puerto Rico eyes plan for 100 percent clean energy | Dems say Congress already rejected part of EPA car emissions plan Dems: Congress rejected part of Trump’s car emissions rollback MORE (Del.), Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonSeveral hurt when truck runs into minimum wage protesters in Michigan Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada MORE (S.D.), Ted Kaufman (Del.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMellman: The triumph of partisanship The Memo: Dem hopes for 2020 grow in midterms afterglow Schumer’s headaches to multiply in next Congress MORE (Mo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterMellman: The triumph of partisanship VA under pressure to deliver Trump reforms Feehery: With 2020 looming, Republicans must learn lessons from midterms MORE (Mont.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Warner 'disappointed' in how Trump replaced Sessions Warner expresses concerns over potential future election meddling MORE (Va.). Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) also opposed the legislation.

Senate Republicans supporting Durbin's bill were: John Barasso (Wyo.), Scott Brown (Mass.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenate panel seeks interview with Steve Bannon, lawyer says Dems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism Collusion judgment looms for key Senate panel MORE (N.C.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissCIA's ‘surveillance state’ is operating against us all Juan Williams: GOP plays the bigotry card in midterms A hard look at America after 9/11 MORE (Ga.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDems vow swift action on gun reform next year Collins reiterates call for legislation to protect Mueller investigation GOP nerves on edge after Sinema takes lead over McSally MORE (Maine), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Waters defends planned probe of Trump finances after GOP backlash Grassley to make chairmanship decision after meeting with colleagues next week MORE (Idaho), John Ensign (Nev.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziGOP nerves on edge after Sinema takes lead over McSally Jockeying already stepping up in House leadership fights Overnight Energy — Presented by Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance — Judge upholds Obama's marine monument | GOP lawmakers worried states using water rule to block fossil fuels | Lawmakers press Trump ahead of ethanol decision MORE (Wyo.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham backs bill to protect Mueller Senate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Election Countdown: Florida braces for volatile recount | Counties race to finish machine recount | Trump ramps up attacks | Abrams files new lawsuit in Georgia | 2020 to be new headache for Schumer | Why California counts its ballots so slowly MORE (S.C.), Charles GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyPavlich: Where is Brett Kavanaugh’s apology? Grassley defends acting AG against calls for recusal Feinstein requests Senate hearings with Whitaker, Sessions MORE (Iowa), Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonUS firm goes on lobbying blitz in fight with Angola Trump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally House conservatives want ethics probe into Dems' handling of Kavanaugh allegations MORE (Ga.), George LeMieux (Fla.), Richard Lugar (Ind.), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischSenate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Divided Congress to clash over Space Force, nuclear arsenal Overnight Defense: Mattis officially approves troops for border | Number to be deployed unclear | Key official confirms plan to trim defense budget | Putin invited to DC next year MORE (Idaho), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE (La.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSenate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle GOP's Wicker reelected in Mississippi Senate race Senate Republicans demand Google hand over memo advising it to hide data vulnerability MORE (Miss.).

Sens. Robert Byrd (D-WVa.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress Election Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Nelson seeks to push back recount deadlines in latest lawsuit MORE (D-Fla.) did not vote.

"This amendment helps big merchants, but consumers will pay the price," MasterCard said in a statement.