Durbin wins battle to pass 'interchange fee' legislation, 64-33

The Senate on Thursday passed controversial legislation clamping down on fees that card issuers charge merchants, handing Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility House panel investigating decision to resume federal executions To combat domestic terrorism, Congress must equip law enforcement to fight rise in white supremacist attacks MORE (D-Ill.) a major victory.

As part of debate on Wall Street overhaul, the Senate passed, 64-33, legislation championed by Durbin that drew significant Republican support. Ten Democrats opposed the legislation, while 17 Republicans crossed the aisle to support a bill that aims to rein in fees placed on debit cards.

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Durbin earlier on Thursday railed on the bank lobby for opposing the legislation. The Independent Community Bankers of America, Credit Union National Association and National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU) loudly opposed Durbin's measure.

"It is a shame that their attempt at getting back at big banks and large credit card companies has spilled over to credit unions and community banks," said Dan Berger, executive vice president at NAFCU. "This will do nothing for consumers but go straight to the bottom line of the big box stores and giant retailers."

Durbin overcame the lobbying to pass legislation that requires the Federal Reserve to issue rules on swipe fees for debit cards to ensure fees are "responsible and proportional" to processing costs. The legislation does not ban swipe card fees. Durbin had won strong backing from merchant and retail groups. Durbin said the restrictions would not apply to banks and credit unions with $10 billion or less in assets.

"It wasn't introduced as a partisan amendment," Durbin said Thursday before the vote. "I brought this because it is a small business, retail amendment that I think is valid and just."

Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchOvernight Health Care: Oversight chair plans to call drug executives to testify on costs | Biden airs anti-'Medicare for All' video | House panel claims Juul deliberately targeted kids Mueller agrees investigation did not 'fail to turn up evidence of conspiracy' Live coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress MORE (D-Vt.), who is a strong supporter of efforts to rein in card fees, praised the Senate vote.

"This momentous, overwhelming vote sends an unambiguous message to credit card companies that the American people have had enough of swipe fees and have had enough of cash register rip-offs," Welch said.

Senate Democrats opposing the amendment were: Daniel Akaka (Hawaii), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusOvernight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor Judge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester MORE (Mont.), Evan Bayh (Ind.), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperAmerica is in desperate need of infrastructure investment: Senate highway bill a step in the right direction FARA should apply to Confucius Institutes The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal MORE (Del.), Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonSeveral hurt when truck runs into minimum wage protesters in Michigan Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada MORE (S.D.), Ted Kaufman (Del.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillEx-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Ocasio-Cortez blasts NYT editor for suggesting Tlaib, Omar aren't representative of Midwest Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (Mo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterNative American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Budget deal sparks scramble to prevent shutdown MORE (Mont.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerFacebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges Overnight Defense: US, Russia tensions grow over nuclear arms | Highlights from Esper's Asia trip | Trump strikes neutral tone on Hong Kong protests | General orders ethics review of special forces MORE (Va.). Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) also opposed the legislation.

Senate Republicans supporting Durbin's bill were: John Barasso (Wyo.), Scott Brown (Mass.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post Trump casts uncertainty over top intelligence role Trump withdraws Ratcliffe as Intelligence pick MORE (N.C.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissHoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post Republicans say Democrats holding up disaster relief as 'Sandy payback' Ex-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances MORE (Ga.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up' The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy Trump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move MORE (Maine), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoA US-UK free trade agreement can hold the Kremlin to account Oversight Republicans demand answers on Capital One data breach On The Money: Fed cuts rates for first time since financial crisis | Trump rips Fed after chief casts doubt on future cuts | Stocks slide | Senate kicks budget vote amid scramble for GOP support MORE (Idaho), John Ensign (Nev.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal On The Money: Fed poised to give Trump boost with rate cut | Parties unable to reach deal in Trump tax return lawsuit | New York opens investigation into Capital One data breach Outgoing Senate Budget chair unveils plans to replace Budget Committee MORE (Wyo.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham warns Trump on Taliban deal in Afghanistan: Learn from 'Obama's mistakes' Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid Trump meets with national security team on Afghanistan peace plan MORE (S.C.), Charles GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP senators call for Barr to release full results of Epstein investigation Trump health official: Controversial drug pricing move is 'top priority' Environmental advocates should take another look at biofuels MORE (Iowa), Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonGeorgia senator discharged from hospital after fall Georgia senator hospitalized after fall Senate GOP raises concerns about White House stopgap plan to avoid shutdown MORE (Ga.), George LeMieux (Fla.), Richard Lugar (Ind.), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China Overnight Defense: US exits landmark arms control treaty with Russia | Pentagon vows to 'fully pursue' once-banned missiles | Ratcliffe out as intel pick | Trump signs budget deal that boosts defense | Trump defends North Korea's Kim as 'friend' The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal MORE (Idaho), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterGrocery group hires new top lobbyist Lobbying World Senate confirms Trump judge who faced scrutiny over abortion views MORE (La.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Trump reportedly weighing executive action on alleged tech bias | WH to convene summit on online extremism | Federal agencies banned from buying Huawei equipment | Lawmakers jump start privacy talks The Hill's Morning Report - How will Trump be received in Dayton and El Paso? Lawmakers jump-start talks on privacy bill MORE (Miss.).

Sens. Robert Byrd (D-WVa.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonAl Franken says he 'absolutely' regrets resigning Democrats target Florida Hispanics in 2020 Poll: Six Democrats lead Trump in Florida match-ups MORE (D-Fla.) did not vote.

"This amendment helps big merchants, but consumers will pay the price," MasterCard said in a statement.