Lawmakers who bucked their parties on the $1T infrastructure bill

Six progressive Democrats and 13 Republicans bucked party lines on Friday in a vote on a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal, which passed the House 228-206.

Democratic Reps. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarSenate needs to confirm Deborah Lipstadt as antisemitism envoy — Now Overnight Defense & National Security — DOD watchdog to review extremism screening Omar calls for closure of Guantánamo Bay prison after 20 years of 'lawlessness and cruelty' MORE (Minn.), Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezSen. Brian Schatz tests positive for COVID-19 Democrats call on FDA to revisit ban on gay, bisexual men donating blood amid shortage Senate Democrats introduce bill to ban stock trades in Congress MORE (N.Y.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse Democrats inquire about possible census undercount in Detroit, other communities Michigan redistricting spat exposes competing interests in Democratic coalition Tlaib announces run in new Detroit district with Lawrence retiring MORE (Mich.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyIt's time for President Biden to use his vast clemency power Ayanna Pressley says she has tested COVID-19 positive in breakthrough case Biden should resolve to cease the 'Red Queen' justice MORE (Mass.), Cori BushCori BushThe Memo: Biden's overpromising problem Centrist Democrats urge progressives to tamp down rhetoric Photos of the Year MORE (Mo.) and Jamaal Bowman (N.Y.) voted against the Senate-approved bill.

GOP Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerClyburn says he's worried about losing House, 'losing this democracy' The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump Republican rep who voted to impeach Trump running for reelection MORE (Ill.) was joined in voting in favor of the bill by fellow Republican Reps. Jefferson Van Drew (N.J.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoClyburn says he's worried about losing House, 'losing this democracy' The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump GOP Rep. Katko, who voted to impeach Trump, won't run for reelection MORE (N.Y.), Don Bacon (Neb.), Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungWest Virginia lawmaker slams GOP colleague over support for infrastructure law Congress to take up marijuana reform this spring Thanks to President Biden, infrastructure is bipartisan again — it needs to stay that way MORE (Alaska), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonThe fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump House Republican, Democrat say political environment on Capitol Hill is 'toxic' Sunday show preview: Omicron surges, and Harris sits for extensive interview MORE (Mich.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithLawmakers seek 'assurances' Olympic uniforms not linked to forced labor Biden signs bill punishing China for Uyghur abuses Last living Nuremberg Trials prosecutor deserves Congressional Gold Medal MORE (N.J), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHouse GOP members introduce legislation targeting Russia over Ukraine Ukraine president, US lawmakers huddle amid tensions with Russia Transformational legislation should be bipartisan again MORE (Pa.), Tom ReedTom ReedOn The Trail: Retirements offer window into House Democratic mood In their own words: Lawmakers, staffers remember Jan. 6 insurrection Members of Congress not running for reelection in 2022 MORE (N.Y.), Anthony GonzalezAnthony GonzalezClyburn says he's worried about losing House, 'losing this democracy' The fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump Republican rep who voted to impeach Trump running for reelection MORE (Ohio), Andrew Garbarino (N.Y.), Nicole Malliotakis (N.Y.) and David McKinleyDavid Bennett McKinleyFour states to feature primaries with two incumbents in 2022 West Virginia lawmaker slams GOP colleague over support for infrastructure law McBath to run in neighboring district after GOP redrew lines MORE (W.Va.). 

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Tensions ran high among Democrats ahead of the vote on Friday as the party struggled to unite on a path forward on the physical infrastructure bill and a separate $1.75 trillion social spending and climate package.

Though the Senate passed the infrastructure deal in August, House progressives had vowed not to vote for the public works bill before passing the social safety net plan, concerned about moderates scaling back popular provisions once the bipartisan deal was law.

Among the provisions included in the massive package are proposals for free preschool for kids ages 3 and 4, boosts to Pell Grant funding, health care expansions, and billions for affordable housing.

Earlier this week, Democratic leadership set its sights on passing both bills by the end of the week. But the party fell short on those goals as the week dragged on amid pushback from moderates who demanded a full Congressional Budget Office (CBO) analysis ​for the larger spending plan.

There was a back-and forth-between the Congressional Progressive Caucus and leadership hours before the infrastructure vote on Friday, with Chairwoman Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalSanders, 50 Democrats unveil bill to send N95 masks to all Americans Centrist Democrats urge progressives to tamp down rhetoric Democrats eager to fill power vacuum after Pelosi exit MORE (D-Wash.) at one point threatening to sink the bill without the social spending plan.

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It wasn’t until after hours of negotiations that a deal was struck between the Congressional Progressive Caucus, moderate Blue Dog Democrats and Congressional Black Caucus on a vote for the bipartisan plan.

As part of the deal, the different factions agreed upon a vote for a rule that sets up a later vote on the larger social spending package, which would advance key parts of the president’s legislative agenda.

Moderates also had to agree to a written commitment that they’ll vote for the social spending plan so long as the CBO report lines up with economic estimates from the White House on the legislation.