On The Money: Dems set Tuesday vote on Trump's emergency declaration | Most Republicans expected to back Trump | Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown drama | Powell heading before Congress

On The Money: Dems set Tuesday vote on Trump's emergency declaration | Most Republicans expected to back Trump | Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown drama | Powell heading before Congress
© Greg Nash

Happy Friday and welcome back to On The Money. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.

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Write us with tips, suggestions and news: slane@thehill.com, vneedham@thehill.com, njagoda@thehill.com and nelis@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @VickofTheHill, @NJagoda and @NivElis.

 

THE BIG DEAL—Dems set up Tuesday vote to block Trump's emergency declaration: House Democrats are quickly moving to block President TrumpDonald John TrumpJimmy Carter: 'I hope there's an age limit' on presidency White House fires DHS general counsel: report Trump to cap California trip with visit to the border MORE's emergency declaration at the southwest border, scheduling a floor vote Tuesday on the disapproval resolution introduced Friday by Rep. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroHispanic Democrats announce 'Latina Prosperity Principles' It's legal to tweet the names of all of Trump's donors, but it's probably not a good idea The exhaustion of Democrats' anti-Trump delusions MORE (D-Texas). 

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Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Democrats will 'certainly' beat Trump in 2020 Kavanaugh impeachment push hits Capitol buzz saw Lewandowski, Democrats tangle at testy hearing MORE (D-Calif.) announced the plan Friday on a conference call with reporters, where she framed Trump's unilateral move as an "institutional assault" that defies the constitutionally dictated separation of powers and threatens the working of the country's democracy.

"The president's act is lawless and does violence to our constitution and therefore to our democracy," she said.

"We do not have a monarchy; we have a separation of powers in our country." The Hill’s Mike Lillis has more here.

 

What we know:

 

LEADING THE DAY

Senate plots to avoid fall shutdown brawl: Senators are hoping to get the government funding process back on track after the months-long fight over President Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Though Congress managed to avoid a partial funding lapse after Trump agreed to sign a deal last week, lawmakers face another deadline later this year to prevent a governmentwide shutdown that would strike roughly a year before the 2020 election

The Senate Appropriations Committee managed to pass all 12 individual fiscal 2019 funding bills with bipartisan support, but their work was derailed on the floor amid a standoff between the White House and Democrats, and infighting among Republicans, that led to multiple continuing resolutions and the longest shutdown in U.S. history. The Hill’s Jordain Carney takes us inside the fiscal 2020 strategy.

 

Brown, Rubio trade barbs over ‘dignity of work’ as Brown mulls presidential bid: Sens. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBipartisan housing finance reform on the road less taken Hillicon Valley: Google to promote original reporting | Senators demand answers from Amazon on worker treatment | Lawmakers weigh response to ransomware attacks Senate Democrats want answers on 'dangerous' Amazon delivery system MORE (D-Ohio) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRepublicans wary of US action on Iran California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation MORE (R-Fla.) traded barbs Thursday over Brown's "dignity of work" mantra.

The feud came as Brown, who is said to be considering a presidential bid, continues his "Dignity of Work" tour that began in Cleveland and will take him to Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — four critical early primary states.

“For all work to have dignity, we must: Raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. Ensure workers are paid the overtime they earn. Pass equal pay for equal work laws. Make it easier for workers to join a union,” Brown tweeted Thursday morning.

“True dignity of work isn’t achieved by just using government to command that low-paying jobs get more pay & benefits," Rubio responded shortly after.

"It is achieved by having policies that promote the creation of private sector jobs where the workers increased productivity results in higher wages & benefits,” he added.

 

ON TAP NEXT WEEK

Monday:

  • The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and National Governors Association host the fourth annual Invest in America Summit, 12 to 4 p.m. 

Tuesday:

  • The Senate Banking Committee will vote on 10 nominees to the Export-Import Bank, National Credit Union Administration, Federal Housing Finance Agency, Treasury Department and Department of Housing and Urban Development, 9:30 a.m.
  • Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell appears before the Senate Banking Committee to testify on the central bank’s semiannual report to Congress, 10 a.m.
  • The House Financial Services Committee holds a hearing entitled “Who's Keeping Score? Holding Credit Bureaus Accountable and Repairing a Broken System,” 10 a.m.
  • The House Small Business Committee holds a hearing entitled “Shutdown Lessons: SBA Capital Access Programs,” 10 a.m.
  • The House Financial Services Committee holds a hearing on diversity trends in the financial services industry, 2 p.m. 

Wednesday:

Thursday:

  • The Senate Banking Committee holds a hearing on legislative proposals on capital formation and corporate governance, 10 a.m.
  • The Cato Institute hosts an event entitled “Trade and American Leadership: The Paradoxes of Power and Wealth from Alexander Hamilton to Donald Trump.”

 

GOOD TO KNOW