On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with $5B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena

On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with $5B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena
© Greg Nash

Happy Thursday and welcome back to On The Money. I'm Sylvan Lane, and here's your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.

See something I missed? Let me know at slane@thehill.com or tweet me @SylvanLane. And if you like your newsletter, you can subscribe to it here: http://bit.ly/1NxxW2N.

Write us with tips, suggestions and news: slane@thehill.com, njagoda@thehill.com and nelis@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @NJagoda and @NivElis.

 

THE BIG DEAL--Senate confirms Scalia as Labor secretary: The Senate has confirmed Eugene Scalia to lead the Labor Department, replacing Alexander AcostaAlex Alexander AcostaThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by National Association of Manufacturers — Whistleblower complaint roils Washington On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena Sanders calls Eugene Scalia's Labor Dept. confirmation 'obscene' MORE who resigned amid questions over a plea deal he brokered for the now-deceased sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

The Senate voted along party lines, 53-44, to confirm Scalia. He is the son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

ADVERTISEMENT

At his confirmation hearing last week, Democrats questioned his record on LGBTQ and disability rights, noting his past writings and court cases. The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Tuesday voted along party lines to advance his nomination.

The Hill's Alex Gangitano tells us more about him here.

 

LEADING THE DAY

Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena: Lawyers for President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MORE and the Manhattan district attorney's office have reached a "temporary arrangement" under which prosecutors won't enforce a subpoena for Trump's tax returns for a short period of time, the district attorney's office said in a court filing Thursday.

  • In a letter to Judge Victor Marrero, the district attorney's office said that it's agreed to refrain from enforcing the subpoena until either two business days after the judge rules on pending motions or until Oct. 7, whichever comes first. 
  • Absent a court order, Trump's accounting firm, Mazars USA, will immediately start a rolling production of documents responsive to the subpoena when the agreement expires.

The agreement comes one day after Marrero, an appointee of former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonPrince Andrew says he regrets staying with Jeffrey Epstein Now for your moment of Zen from the Trump impeachment hearings The Hill's Morning Report — Public impeachment drama resumes today MORE, ordered the parties in the lawsuit to try to reach an agreement on how to proceed before he rules in the case. The Hill's Naomi Jagoda tells us what it means here.

 

Bill with $5 billion in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections: Republicans at a contentious hearing on Thursday pushed through a Homeland Security spending measure that included $5 billion for President Trump's proposed border wall over the opposition of Democrats, who vowed to block the bill's passage on the floor.

"This is a waste of taxpayer dollars and bad for our country," said Appropriations Committee Vice Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress hunts for path out of spending stalemate This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Senators press NSA official over shuttered phone surveillance program MORE (D-Vt.), the committee's top Democrat.

"It is not about solving real problems, it is about fulfilling a campaign promise. And let's not forget the president promised that Mexico would pay for the wall," he added.

With the exception of Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinFormer coal exec Don Blankenship launches third-party presidential bid Centrist Democrats seize on state election wins to rail against Warren's agenda Overnight Energy: Senate eyes nixing 'forever chemicals' fix from defense bill | Former Obama EPA chief named CEO of green group | Senate reviews Interior, FERC nominees criticized on ethics MORE (D-W.Va.), every Democrat on the committee voted against the bill, which passed 17-14.

Dem amendments: The committee also rejected two Democratic amendments to the $70.7 billion bill that would strip out the wall money and block Trump from using emergency powers to reprogram funds from other accounts.

"I find it absurd that we are doing backflips to avoid exercising our constitutional role," said Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzCongress should lift the ban on medical cannabis access for military veterans Booker introduces bill banning facial recognition tech in public housing Senate Democrat: Colleague was working on fantasy football trade instead of listening to Schumer MORE (D-Hawaii). Responding to complaints that such issues would be better addressed in the Military Construction bill, from which Trump reprogrammed $3.6 billion, Schatz incredulously pointed out that the bill had been withdrawn from consideration last week to avoid discussing the issue.

"I agree that this is not the ideal venue for this vote, but this is the only time we'll have the opportunity to express ourselves," he said.

Some Republicans on the committee expressed their frustration with what they said was executive overreach, but voted against the amendment anyway.

"He's speaking truth to all of us as appropriators here," Sen. Lisa Murkowsky (R-Alaska) said in response to Schatz's comments.

The Hill's Niv Elis tells us how we got here.

 

GOOD TO KNOW

 

ODDS AND ENDS

  • The Justice Department's antitrust investigation into four automakers is reviving concerns that the Trump administration is weaponizing its competition enforcers against political rivals.
  • The food-delivery platform DoorDash revealed on Thursday that 4.9 million of its users, vendors and delivery workers were exposed in a data breach to an "unauthorized third party."