On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns

On The Money: Trump signs short-term spending bill to avoid shutdown | Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 | California high court strikes down law targeting Trump tax returns
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Happy Thursday and welcome back to On The Money. I'm Sylvan Lane, and here's your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.

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THE BIG DEAL--Trump signs short-term spending bill to avert shutdown: President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS reimposes UN sanctions on Iran amid increasing tensions Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally MORE on Thursday signed a funding stopgap measure just hours ahead of a shutdown deadline, extending funding levels from the last fiscal year until Dec. 20.

The measure, which passed in the Senate earlier Thursday and in the House on Tuesday, bought Congressional negotiators an additional four weeks to hammer out a deal on how to spend the agreed $1.37 trillion for the 2020 fiscal year, which began Oct. 1, and tackle thorny issues including Trump's request to fund a border wall.

But behind the scenes, appropriators are far from sure they will be able to work out a deal in time, with many raising concerns that an additional stopgap measure could be necessary ahead of Christmas. The Hill's Niv Elis tells us about the road ahead here.

 

LEADING THE DAY

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Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019: Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Trump is betting big on the suburbs, but his strategy is failing 'bigly' Trump orders flags at half-staff to honor 'trailblazer' Ginsburg MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday cast doubt on the possibility of passing an updated North American trade deal by the end of 2019, a departure from her previous characterization of the deal as "imminent."

"I'm not even sure if we came to an agreement today that it would be enough time to finish," she said, referencing an end-of-year timeline many had hoped for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

U.S. Trade Representative Robert LighthizerRobert (Bob) Emmet LighthizerWhiskey, workers and friends caught in the trade dispute crossfire GOP senator warns quick vote on new NAFTA would be 'huge mistake' Pelosi casts doubt on USMCA deal in 2019 MORE met with Pelosi and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealRep. Cedric Richmond set to join House Ways and Means Committee Coons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief MORE (D-Mass.) later on Thursday, but a final deal remained out of reach. The Hill's Niv Elis fills us in here.

What comes next: Neal said that of five outstanding issues, they had reached an agreement on roughly half of them and would continue negotiations next week. He remained hopeful, however, that the deal could be finalized and signed into law before the New Year.

GOP not happy: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump asked Chamber of Commerce to reconsider Democratic endorsements: report The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - White House moves closer to Pelosi on virus relief bill Trump's sharp words put CDC director on hot seat MORE (R-Calif.) took a swipe at Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) for casting doubt on whether the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) will pass before the end of the year, accusing the California Democrat of prioritizing impeachment over the updated North American trade deal.

 

California high court strikes down state law targeting Trump tax returns: California's highest state court on Thursday struck down a law that would have required President Trump to hand over his tax returns as a condition to appearing on the state's ballot for the Republican primary.

In a unanimous ruling, the California Supreme Court held that key portions of the Presidential Tax Transparency and Accountability Act, signed in July, violated the state's constitution.

The law also requires gubernatorial candidates to disclose their tax returns for ballot access, but the California justices did not address that portion of the law. The Hill's John Kruzel and Naomi Jagoda explain the ruling here.

 

And there were developments in the two tax return cases the Supreme Court is weighing whether to take up.

Read more: Manhattan DA asks Supreme Court to let them enforce subpoena for Trump tax returns

Read more: House Dems urge Supreme Court to allow subpoena for Trump's financial records

 

Legislation on Libra: A pair of lawmakers on Thursday introduced legislation that would place stringent government oversight on Facebook's incoming digital currency and similar projects.

The bill from Reps. Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaHispanic Caucus asks for Department of Labor meeting on COVID in meatpacking plants Texas Democrat proposes legislation requiring masks in federal facilities Hispanic Caucus requests meeting with private detention center CEOs MORE (D-Texas) and Lance GoodenLance GoodenGOP lawmakers call for new sanctions on senior Chinese officials Hillicon Valley: Uber lays off 3,000 | FBI unlocks Pensacola shooter's phones | Lawmakers introduce bill restricting purchase of airline equipment from Chinese companies Bipartisan bill would restrict purchases of airport equipment from Chinese companies MORE (R-Texas) would place the Libra digital coin squarely under the Securities and Exchange Commission's jurisdiction, a move that would subject the cryptocurrency to a set of extensive and well-established regulations.

Facebook has denied that the Libra coin is a security. But lawmakers have struggled to understand how to classify the ambitious Libra project because the U.S. government has not yet defined which federal agencies will be in charge of regulating cryptocurrencies.

More from The Hill's Emily Birnbaum on the bill here.

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Wasserman Schultz makes bid for House Appropriations Committee gavel: Florida Democrat Debbie Wasserman SchultzDeborah (Debbie) Wasserman SchultzFlorida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum Five things to watch at the Democratic National Convention Michelle Obama wishes Barack a happy birthday: 'My favorite guy' MORE on Thursday threw her hat in the ring to become the next chair of the powerful House Appropriations Committee.

In October, the committee's current chairwoman Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTop House Democrats call for watchdog probe into Pompeo's Jerusalem speech With Biden, advocates sense momentum for lifting abortion funding ban Progressives look to flex their muscle in next Congress after primary wins MORE (D-N.Y.), 82, announced that she would retire at the end of the term, leaving open a race for one of the most coveted gavels in the Congress.

Expect a fight: Wasserman Schultz, who chairs the appropriations subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, will face stiff competition.

Rep. Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturUkraine language in GOP platform underscores Trump tensions Eye on gavel, Wasserman Schultz proposes panel on racial inequality in spending Overnight Defense: Army now willing to rename bases named after Confederates | Dems demand answers on 'unfathomable' nuke testing discussions | Pentagon confirms death of north African al Qaeda leader MORE (D-Ohio), the longest-serving female House member, has seniority on the committee, while Rep. Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroTrump HHS official faces firestorm after attacks on scientists Ahead of a coronavirus vaccine, Mexico's drug pricing to have far-reaching impacts on Americans Shutdown politics set to collide with coronavirus aid MORE (D-Conn.), an ally of Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) who heads the subcommittee covering the largest non-defense spending bill, has also said she will seek the position. More from Niv here.

 

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GOOD TO KNOW

 

ODDS AND ENDS

  • The House Energy and Commerce committee announced a probe into Live Nation and other top online ticket sale companies on Thursday.
  • A group of senators from both parties on Thursday urged the Trump administration to stop issuing licenses for U.S. companies to do business with Chinese telecom giant Huawei, warning that even limited business with Huawei could pose a national security risk.
  • Office-sharing company WeWork announced Thursday it is laying off about 2,400 employees worldwide, as the company looks to cut costs and stabilize its business model.