Trade vote stirs angst on the right

Trade vote stirs angst on the right

Trade legislation is sowing discord among Senate Republicans that could make it tougher than expected to pass fast-track trade authority and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

While much of the attention in the trade fight has focused on the divide between President Obama and liberal Democrats, Republican leaders are facing dissent within their own caucus because of currency manipulation and immigration concerns.

“The polling is bad, and some people are getting nervous,” said a GOP senator who requested anonymity to talk about his conversations with colleagues.

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Senate Republicans are looking for political cover to vote for trade promotion authority (TPA) legislation, which would empower Obama to negotiate the TPP — a trade pact with 11 nations — that could not be amended or filibustered in Congress.

Potential Republican “no” votes on the bill include Sens. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over 'send her back' coverage House gears up for Mueller testimony Trump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender MORE (Ala.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamUS-Saudi Arabia policy needs a dose of 'realpolitik' Media cried wolf: Calling every Republican a racist lost its bite Rubio criticizes reporters, Democrat for racism accusations against McCain MORE (S.C.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Top North Carolina newspapers editorial board to GOP: 'Are you OK with a racist president?' Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (N.C.) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoAnyone for tennis? Washington Kastles Charity Classic returns this week The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment White House, Congress inch toward debt, budget deal MORE (W.Va.).

Ten to 15 Senate Democrats are expected to vote for the fast-track bill, which means Republican leaders can only afford to lose fewer than 10 caucus members.

“I think it’s going to be tight,” said Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanVA chief pressed on efforts to prevent veteran suicides McConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal There is a severe physician shortage and it will only worsen MORE (R-Ark.), who is leaning in favor of voting yes because the farm community supports the legislation.

 Republican senators say Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch Funding a strong defense of our nation's democratic process can't wait The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (R-Ky.) and his leadership team have begun to count votes, a sign that they’re not taking passage of the measures for granted.

“It could be a problem depending on how few Democrats vote for it. The president has to step up and work it,” said another GOP senator, who requested anonymity to discuss his party’s whip count.

While the trade deals are popular with the business community, they are controversial among the conservative base in states — such as Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, North Carolina and South Carolina — where Republican incumbents are running for reelection next year.

“Why would any Republican give President Obama more authority?” said Ed Martin, president of Eagle Forum, a conservative advocacy group.

Beyond the procedural argument, Martin said a growing number of people in the GOP base think free trade agreements are harmful for the working class and bad for jobs.

“The Republican Party is becoming aware of this more and more,” Martin said. “I don’t think Republicans should make it easier to have more free trade agreements that are bad for this country.”

A survey conducted by YouGov.com at the end of March found that 39 percent of Republicans think free trade agreements have a negative impact on wages and jobs. Thirty-one percent of Democrats felt the deals would depress wages, while 24 percent thought they would hurt employment.

The same survey showed only 10 percent of Republicans think free trade agreements will boost wages.

Patrick Davis, a Republican strategist, said GOP voters’ views of free trade have changed since the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement in the early ’90s, especially in northern Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and South Carolina.

“The base voters, Republican voters and even Tea Party voters, are economic voters,” Davis said. “Those in Washington in the Republican leadership are at odds with their base over this issue because Republicans and Tea Party types have seen wages go down, lost wages and lost jobs since the last time we did a big trade deal.”

The fast-track bill passed out of the Finance Committee on Wednesday with a strong bipartisan vote, 20-6. Seven Democrats voted for it and only one Republican, Burr, voted no.

Burr told The Hill he was concerned that tobacco, a major product in his home state, might receive unfair treatment in future trade agreements.

While the number of Democrats who voted for the fast-track bill — which was jointly negotiated by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump to award racing legend Roger Penske with Presidential Medal of Freedom Trump awards Presidential Medal of Freedom to economist, former Reagan adviser Arthur Laffer Second ex-Senate staffer charged in aiding doxxing of GOP senators MORE (R-Utah), House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump quietly rolled back programs to detect, combat weapons of mass destruction: report Ocasio-Cortez top aide emerges as lightning rod amid Democratic feud Juan Williams: GOP in a panic over Mueller MORE (R-Wis.) and Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenDemocrat: Treasury 'acknowledged the unprecedented process' in Trump tax return rejection Hillicon Valley: Twitter says Trump 'go back' tweet didn't violate rules | Unions back protests targeting Amazon 'Prime Day' | Mnuchin voices 'serious concerns' about Facebook crypto project | Congress mobilizes on cyber threats to electric grid Top Democrat demands answers on election equipment vulnerabilities MORE (Ore.), the ranking Democrat on Finance — appeared promising, Democratic aides say the final number of Democratic yeses is unlikely to exceed 15.

“It’s possible that more than half of the yes votes already voted for it in committee,” said a senior Democratic aide.

Republicans have expressed concerns over enhanced trade authority that include the measure’s failure to address currency manipulation by China and others, the possibility that it could empower Obama to increase immigration levels and the fate of home-state exports such as tobacco and coal.

“I’m really looking at it carefully. Our state is under serious economic distress right now. So I’m going to look at it to see if it brings greater opportunities,” Capito said.

Sessions is worried that giving Obama, and future presidents, fast-track power could serve as a backdoor to increased immigration.

He circulated a “Dear Colleague” letter recently warning: “The real danger here is that before the ink is dry on TPA, and at any time during the life of TPA, any president can negotiate changes to our immigration laws.”

The Finance Committee has pushed back against this criticism, issuing a memo asserting the Obama administration has no authority under TPA or any pending trade agreement to unilaterally change immigration law.

 The failure of the TPA bill to address currency manipulation is a problem for Graham and Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanFighting the opioid epidemic: Congress can't just pass laws, but must also push to enforce them The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Rising number of GOP lawmakers criticize Trump remarks about minority Dems MORE (R-Ohio), who served as U.S. Trade Representative under former President George W. Bush and is facing a tough reelection.

The Finance Committee rejected Portman’s amendment that would have required the executive branch to include enforceable currency manipulation standards in any future trade deal. 

Portman’s proposal also would have put “teeth” into International Monetary Fund standards for currency that other countries have already agreed to, according to a summary from his office.

Portman said the current language in the fast-track legislation is “aspirational” but not “enforceable,” and warned he is not an automatic yes on the floor vote even though he supported the measure in committee.

“It’s a tougher choice because I think it’s important to have in there,” he said.

The Finance panel voted 18-8 to add language to a separate customs enforcement bill requiring the Commerce Department to crack down on currency manipulation by imposing duties.

But Republicans concerned about the issue grumble there’s little chance that that legislation will become law.

“That’s problematic for me,” Graham said about the rejection of Portman’s amendment.

“Will the currency legislation that was adopted, will it get to the president’s desk? I need to know that.”