Clinton opposes TPP vote in the lame-duck session

Clinton opposes TPP vote in the lame-duck session
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Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSenate panel subpoenas Roger Stone associate for Russia probe Webb: The new mob: Anti-American Dems Clinton to hold fundraiser for Menendez in NJ next month MORE said she is opposed to Congress holding a vote on a sweeping Asia-Pacific agreement during the lame-duck session after the November election if she wins the presidency. 

Clinton, who announced her opposition to the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) deal after negotiations were completed last year, said Congress shouldn't take up the agreement as it is currently written either this year or next if she is elected. 

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"I have said I oppose the TPP agreement — and that means before and after the election," she replied in a questionnaire released on Friday by the Oregon Fair Trade Campaign, a coalition of more than 25 labor, environmental and human rights organizations.

When asked about whether the TPP does enough to address labor and human rights abuses abroad she said that U.S. trade policy is in need of sweeping changes.

"I’m not interested in tinkering around the margins of our trade policy," Clinton said. "I think we need a fundamental rethink of how we approach trade deals going forward."

She said that the TPP also needs to do more to crack down on currency manipulation. 

"I will take on foreign countries that keep their goods artificially cheap by manipulating their currencies, and expand our toolbox to include effective new remedies to respond, such as duties, tariffs, or other measures," she said. 

The final three presidential candidates — Clinton, Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersPoll: Gillum leads DeSantis by 5 points in Florida governor race Sanders: Kavanaugh accusers 'have risked their lives to come forward' Helping citizens unite in post-Citizens United America MORE of Vermont and presumptive Republican nominee Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: Dems playing destructive 'con game' with Kavanaugh Several Yale Law classmates who backed Kavanaugh call for misconduct investigation Freedom Caucus calls on Rosenstein to testify or resign MORE —have all leveled harsh criticism against President Obama's trade agenda. 

In the Oregon questionnaire, Clinton called it "critical" to address labor protections, human rights, as well as health, environmental and consumer safety issues in any new trade agreements.

She said she would oppose any new trade deal unless they meet her three-point test of creating U.S. jobs, raising wages and improving national security.

"Across all of our policies, American workers and American jobs have to come first," Clinton said.

"And one area where we’ve gotten this balance wrong over the years is trade," she said. "Looking back over the past decades, as globalization picked up steam, there’s no doubt that the benefits of trade have not been as widely enjoyed as many predicted. Corporations may have won, but many workers lost."