March tariff increase would cost 934K jobs, advocacy group says

March tariff increase would cost 934K jobs, advocacy group says
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“The trade war is already creating enormous economic loss, and this report shows how much worse it could get," said Charles BoustanyCharles William BoustanyMarch tariff increase would cost 934K jobs, advocacy group says Bottom Line On The Money: US adds 155k jobs in November | Unemployment holds at 3.7 percent | Wage growth strengthening | Trump signs stopgap spending bill delaying shutdown MORE, a former congressman and spokesman for Tariffs Hurt the Heartland.
 
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The group's projections also said gross domestic product (GDP) would drop by one-third of a percentage point if the new tariffs are enacted on March 1.
 
Trump imposed tariffs on billions of dollars' worth of Chinese imports last year, and has threatened to increase them at the beginning of March if a new trade deal isn't reached with China. Negotiations with China are expected to continue next week, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinThe Hill's Morning Report: How will Trump be received at G-7? White House won't move forward with billions in foreign aid cuts Trump says he'll decide on foreign aid cuts within a week MORE scheduled to travel to China.
 
If China retaliates against the United States, as it has done in the past, U.S. job losses would increase to 2.1 million, and lop a full percentage point off GDP, costing the average family of four $2,294, according to the study.
 
The group presented its estimates on Capitol Hill alongside a bipartisan group of lawmakers that included Sens. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperEPA ordered to set stronger smog standards America is in desperate need of infrastructure investment: Senate highway bill a step in the right direction FARA should apply to Confucius Institutes MORE (D-Del.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLawmakers sound alarm on China's disinformation campaign in Hong Kong Facebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges MORE (D-Va.), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonThe road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces GOP senator: Gun control debate 'hasn't changed much at all' back home GOP senators call for Barr to release full results of Epstein investigation MORE (R-Wis.).