Senate Dems claim enough votes to block Medicaid overhaul

Forty-one Senate Democrats have signed on to several letters vowing to oppose House Republicans' proposed Medicaid overhaul, ensuring the proposal won't get enough votes to clear a filibuster hurdle.

One letter, to President Obama, spearheaded by longtime Medicaid defender Sen. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerWorld Health Day: It's time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation MORE (D-W.Va.), garnered 37 signatures. It makes clear that the senators will oppose proposals to cap federal spending on Medicaid, a program whose spending currently fluctuates with need.

Four other senators — Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions Five takeaways from Mueller's report Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (Calif.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDenver Post editorial board says Gardner endorsement was 'mistake' Gardner gets latest Democratic challenge from former state senator Setting the record straight about No Labels MORE (Col.), Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetMichael Bennet declared cancer-free, paving way for possible 2020 run License to discriminate: Religious exemption laws are trampling rights in rural America Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (Col.), and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders announces first endorsements in South Carolina Telehealth is calling — will Congress pick up? 2020 Dems call on Mueller to testify about redacted report MORE (Minn.) — wrote separate letters to the president.

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"Just as past efforts to undermine Medicaid coverage and health security to millions of Americans have been defeated," the Rockefeller letter reads, "we look forward to working with you to oppose such efforts in the near future."

House Republicans have adopted a budget proposal that would slash federal Medicaid spending by more than $700 billion over 10 years by turning it into a block grant to states. The letter's signers oppose that policy, as well as separate proposals to cap federal spending on the program.