Thune: 'Everyone knows' that HealthCare.gov will eventually be fixed

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSchumer blasts 'red flag' gun legislation as 'ineffective cop out' Lawmakers jump-start talks on privacy bill Trump border fight throws curveball into shutdown prospects MORE (R-S.D.) said Thursday he expects HealthCare.gov will be fixed. 

“The website rollout is one thing, and they’ll get that fixed,” Thune said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “Everybody knows that eventually.” 

His comment comes amid GOP lawmakers’ intense criticism of the ObamaCare rollout because of ongoing technical glitches in its online marketplace. 

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius testified about the issues before Congress on Wednesday, where she said “hold me accountable for the debacle.” 

Last week, HHS officials promised to have the website running smoothly by the end of November. 

Despite Republicans’ overwhelming rebuke of the website, they’ve collectively switched gears to argue the problems with ObamaCare stretch far beyond the website. 

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“I’m leading my colleagues in the House in the fight to protect all Americans from a health care law that has serious problems that go far beyond the healthcare.gov technical disaster,” Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) wrote in his weekly column on Monday.  

Thune added, “We’re just all very grateful to the president and the Democrats that now that the shutdown is over, we’re talking about something else.”

A majority of Republican members fought to defund ObamaCare in this fiscal year’s budget, which led to the 16-day shutdown of the government. 

In his Thursday appearance, Thune suggested Republicans need to take a step back in their fight, after being asked if the GOP will continue to push for the law’s repeal.  

“We have to win the argument that Republicans can be conservative, they can be principled, but we have to be smart,” he said. “We have to be strategic, and we’ve got to be thinking about how we’re going to be positioning ourselves for the long-game.”

The long game, Thune added, is winning elections.