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Senator: ObamaCare's 30-hour week sowing 'chaos and confusion'

It’s time to “remedy a flaw” in ObamaCare that has forced employers to cut workers' hours, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGraham: I hope Dems 'get their ass kicked' for conduct around Kavanaugh St. Lawrence alumni, faculty want honorary degree for Collins revoked 'Suspicious letter' mailed to Maine home of Susan Collins MORE said Monday.

Collins (R-Maine) and Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyElection Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach Dems outraising Republicans in final stretch of midterms Trump Jr. to stump in Indiana for Pence’s brother and governor hopeful MORE (D-Ind.) are working to drum up support for legislation introduced this week that would restore the "traditional" workweek in ObamaCare by changing the definition from 30 to 40 hours.

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Speaking at a press conference Wednesday with Donnelly, Collins said the 30-hour rule has caused "considerable chaos and confusion" for the business sector.

The workweek bill drew more than a dozen Democratic votes when offered last year, but the White House on Wednesday promised the measure would be met with a veto if it ever reached President Obama’s desk.

“By moving the threshold to 40 hours, this legislation could cause the problem it claims to solve by greatly increasing the number of workers for whom employers may have an incentive to reduce hours to avoid the requirement,” the White House said in a statement of policy.

Collins and Donnelly urged Obama to reconsider.

"My hope is that the president will reconsider this veto threat, which is bipartisan, which does not undermine the essential structure of [the law]," Collins said.

"The president has said repeatedly that he is open to bipartisan proposal to fix provisions of the law. It's evident that even the president believes there are problem with the employer mandate," she said, citing multiple delays in the policy.

Donnelly said he supported ObamaCare but added, “that doesn't mean that the law can't be strengthened.”

"A full-time work week is 40 hours," he said.

The bill is one of several measures — including legislation on the Keystone XL pipeline — that Republican leaders hope to pass in the early weeks of the new Congress.

The workweek measure has also been at the center of a heavy lobbying campaign from  business groups such as the Chamber of Commerce, the National Retail Federation and the National Restaurant Association.

Several representatives from industry groups were on hand for Wednesday's press conference, which featured testimony from a restaurant industry leader and a community college official.

— Elise Viebeck contributed.