Clinton tops 2016 field in drug industry donations

Clinton tops 2016 field in drug industry donations
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Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClintons, Stacey Abrams meeting Texas Democrats Biden says Russia spreading misinformation ahead of 2022 elections Highest-ranking GOP assemblyman in WI against another audit of 2020 vote MORE has received more campaign cash from drug companies than any candidate in either party, even as she proudly declares the industry is one of her biggest enemies.

Clinton accepted $164,315 in the first six months of the campaign from drug companies, far more than the rest of the 2016 field, according to an analysis by Stat News.

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Cash from drug companies poured in despite Clinton’s tough public stance on the industry. Last month, she unveiled a plan to combat rising drug prices by clamping down on the rules for pharmaceuticals. In last week’s Democratic debate, she listed off drug companies among the enemies she is most proud to have made in politics.

Clinton has taken a harder stance on drug companies than any other candidate besides Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersAngst grips America's most liberal city Democrats warn shrinking Biden's spending plan could backfire Democrats say they have the votes to advance .5T budget measure MORE (I-Vt.), who has also skewered “Big Pharma” as he seeks the Democratic nomination.

This week, Sanders rejected a $2,700 contribution from Martin Shkreli, the now-infamous CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, which hiked prices for a life-saving drug by 4,000 percent overnight.

Among Republicans, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz228 Republican lawmakers urge Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade GOP, Democrats battle over masks in House, Senate Human rights can't be a sacrificial lamb for climate action MORE (R-Texas) took in the most at $96,045, followed by $52,430 to Sen Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioBreak glass in case of emergency — but not for climate change Democrats join GOP in pressuring Biden over China, virus origins Senators introduce bipartisan bill to expand foreign aid partnerships MORE (R-Fla.) and $50,700 to former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.