Clinton tops 2016 field in drug industry donations

Clinton tops 2016 field in drug industry donations
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Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Even the Post Office is political now | Primary action tonight | Super PACS at war Should Biden consider a veteran for vice president? Biden leads Trump by nearly 40 points in California: poll MORE has received more campaign cash from drug companies than any candidate in either party, even as she proudly declares the industry is one of her biggest enemies.

Clinton accepted $164,315 in the first six months of the campaign from drug companies, far more than the rest of the 2016 field, according to an analysis by Stat News.

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Cash from drug companies poured in despite Clinton’s tough public stance on the industry. Last month, she unveiled a plan to combat rising drug prices by clamping down on the rules for pharmaceuticals. In last week’s Democratic debate, she listed off drug companies among the enemies she is most proud to have made in politics.

Clinton has taken a harder stance on drug companies than any other candidate besides Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary Hillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package MORE (I-Vt.), who has also skewered “Big Pharma” as he seeks the Democratic nomination.

This week, Sanders rejected a $2,700 contribution from Martin Shkreli, the now-infamous CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, which hiked prices for a life-saving drug by 4,000 percent overnight.

Among Republicans, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Democrats prepare seven-figure spending spree in Texas On The Trail: The first signs of a post-Trump GOP Trump tests GOP loyalty with election tweet and stimulus strategy MORE (R-Texas) took in the most at $96,045, followed by $52,430 to Sen Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate Intel panel approves final Russia report, moves toward public release Negotiators hit gas on coronavirus talks as frustration mounts Mnuchin: Negotiators no closer to coronavirus deal than a week ago MORE (R-Fla.) and $50,700 to former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.