Obama urges Congress not to repeal ObamaCare

 
During his weekly White House address, Obama encouraged Americans who don't currently have healthcare to enroll in the program, and said that he wants to "build on the progress we’ve made" with the law.
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"Whether or not you get insurance through the Affordable Care Act, that’s the health care system as we now know it," Obama said. "Because our goal wasn’t just to make sure more people have coverage – it was to make sure more people have better coverage. That’s why we want to build on the progress we’ve made – and I’ve put forth a number of ideas for how to improve the Affordable Care Act."  

The president then criticized the Republican effort to repel and replace the law, stating that such a political move would erase all progress that has been made toward securing a better healthcare system in America.

"Now Republicans in Congress want to repeal the whole thing and start from scratch – but trying to undo some of it could undo all of it. All those consumer protections – whether you get your health insurance from ObamaCare, or Medicare, or Medicaid, or on the job – could go right out the window," he said.  

"So any partisan talk you hear about repealing or replacing it should be judged by whether they keep all those improvements that benefit you and your family right now," Obama added.

The president argued that repealing the law now would result in drastic outcomes and make nearly 30 million Americans lose their healthcare coverage.

"One new study shows that if Congress repeals Obamacare as they’ve proposed, nearly 30 million Americans would lose their coverage. Four in five of them would come from working families. More than 9 million Americans who would receive tax credits to keep insurance affordable would no longer receive that help. That is unacceptable," Obama said.
 
President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rips Dems' demands, impeachment talk: 'Witch Hunt continues!' Nevada Senate passes bill that would give Electoral College votes to winner of national popular vote The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi remains firm despite new impeachment push MORE and many of his Republican colleagues have long targeted the healthcare law, pledging to repeal and replace it if given the opportunity. Since winning the White House in November and GOP majorities in the House and Senate, Trump and Republican leaders have pledges to axe the legislation.