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Liberals blast Dems who voted to delay ObamaCare mandate

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MoveOn members have gained nearly 7,000 signatures against Dems who supported the delay in opposition to President Obama.

In one petition, author Judith Dias slammed Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Calif.) for his vote, stating that she and her husband are "counting on being insured under the Affordable Care Act." 

"We didn't vote for you so that you could cave in to the extremists who are now holding our government hostage," Dias wrote.

"You need to stand strong and make sure that ObamaCare is implemented. No delays, no changes. That's why you were elected, and that's why Obama was elected, both terms. Stop the craziness and vote to continue implementing ObamaCare in its entirety.”

Other members targeted for their votes include Reps. Scott Peters (D-Calif.), Brad Schneider (D-Ill.), Gary Peters (D-Mich.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyOvernight Defense: Tucker Carlson comments cause military rage | Capitol guard duty questioned | Vet who served in Marine One unit charged in insurrection Voters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican House Democrats eyeing much broader Phase 3 stimulus MORE (D-Calif.), Sean Maloney (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth Esty (D-Conn.), Dan Maffei (D-N.Y.), Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickSurgeon who treated Gabby Giffords after shooting launches House bid in Arizona These House lawmakers aren't seeking reelection in 2022 Arizona state senator announces bid for Kirkpatrick's seat MORE (D-Ariz.), Bill Enyart (D-Ill.), Bill Owens (D-N.Y.), Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosGOP campaign chief confident his party will win back House The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - At 50 days in charge, Democrats hail American Rescue Plan as major win House Democrats' campaign arm lifts ban on consultants who work for primary challengers MORE (D-Ill.) and Collin Peterson (D-Minn.).

The GOP held a vote to delay the individual mandate after the Obama administration announced that it would not require larger employers to offer health insurance until 2015, one year later than originally planned.

Republicans argued individuals deserve one year of relief from the requirement to carry health insurance since larger employers were given flexibility under their own mandate.

The bill to delay the individual mandate passed 251-174 on July 17, with 22 Democrats voting yes.

Dems who opposed the measure said it would seriously raise healthcare premiums and imperil the Affordable Care Act.