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Ryan: GOP healthcare plan was written with Trump

Ryan: GOP healthcare plan was written with Trump
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House GOP leadership's ObamaCare repeal plan was written with President Trump, Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanRepublicans must learn from the election mistake on immigration Congress braces for high-drama lame duck Without new Democratic message, Donald Trump is the 2020 favorite MORE (R-Wis.) said Wednesday. 

House conservatives are pushing Trump for changes to the plan, but Ryan said they shouldn't expect anything major. 

"Obviously, the major components are staying intact because this is something we wrote with President Trump," Ryan told Fox Business. 

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Conservatives take issue with the plan's refundable tax credits, which they call "new entitlements," and argue the entire original healthcare law should be repealed. 

The GOP plan also keeps a number of ObamaCare's provisions, including one that requires insurers to cover people with pre-existing conditions and cover 10 essential health benefits, such as prescription drugs and preventive services. 

Conservatives also want to see the Medicaid expansion rolled back sooner than what the current plan lays out. 

Members of the House Freedom Caucus have been in discussions with Trump about possible changes, but have not offered specifics. 

"The administration has been engaged and working around the clock to bring all sides together," caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) told The Hill this week. 

“I am optimistic that if leadership of the House and Senate is willing to engage in good-faith negotiations, we will find a solution that truly brings down health insurance premiums and addresses the pre-existing conditions in a very effective manner.”

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Tuesday the administration is working with Ryan on a manager's amendment to make changes to the legislation.

Those changes, which GOP leadership offices declined to discuss, could be aimed at bringing conservatives on board. 

Ryan spokesman Doug Andres on Tuesday said it was "too early to discuss" any manager's amendment.

A manager’s amendment is typically used after the traditional committee process to make changes to a bill to gain more support before a floor vote.