FEATURED:

GOP senator: I 'can't imagine' voting yes on health bill in a week

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonOvernight Defense: Trump at G-20 | Calls Ukraine 'sole reason' for canceling Putin meeting | Senate passes resolution condemning Russian actions | Armed Services chairmen warn against defense cuts Senate passes resolution condemning Russian aggression against Ukraine Overnight Defense: Trump faces new Russia test over Ukraine | Cancels plans to meet Putin at G-20 | Officials float threat of military action against Iran MORE (R-Wisc.) on Wednesday cast doubt on whether he would vote for the Republican ObamaCare repeal bill next week, pointing to the short timeframe to review the bill. 

“What I’ve told leadership very clearly is I’m going to need time, and my constituents are going to need time to evaluate exactly how this is going to affect them, so I personally think that holding a vote on this next week would definitely be rushed,” Johnson said on CNN. “I can’t imagine, quite honestly, that I’d have the information to evaluate and justify a yes vote within just a week.” 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Sunday shows preview: Trade talks, Cohen sentencing memo take center stage Trump tells McConnell to let Senate vote on criminal justice reform MORE (R-Ky.) plans to unveil a discussion draft of a bill on Thursday and then hold a vote next week. A range of GOP senators have said they would have liked a more open process with more time to review the bill. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Johnson is one of the first to say that he might actually vote against the bill because of a lack of time to review it. 

“I’ve told [McConnell], unless I have the input from my constituents, unless I have got the information I need to justify a yes vote, I won’t be voting yes,” Johnson said. 

 “What I want to do is I want to fully vet it in the public,” he added. “I want to make sure that my constituents have enough time to provide input.”

Johnson has questioned the strategy of pushing for a Republican-only bill and says that he thinks lawmakers should first act on a narrower measure aimed at stabilizing insurance markets.