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ObamaCare fight moves from Washington to local districts

ObamaCare fight moves from Washington to local districts
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Advocacy groups opposing the Senate’s health plan are seizing on a weeklong congressional recess to turn up the heat on Republicans.

Groups on the left and the right, running the gamut from Planned Parenthood to Freedomworks, say they will use the break to pressure members before a possible vote on legislation as soon as the second week of July.

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“We know the bill is coming back as bad as ever, so we’re going to turn up the heat,” said MoveOn Campaign Director Justin Krebs.

“The bill is not what was promised to voters,” said ForAmerica President David Bozell. “It’s a liberal piece of legislation that has been met with record low levels of support.”

Planned Parenthood, which stands to be defunded for one year under the Senate bill, will hold more than 100 events in key states across the country such as Alaska, Arizona and Maine.

“Planned Parenthood supporters will be out in force during the July recess, speaking out against the worst bill for women’s health and demanding their Senators vote no on Trumpcare,” Planned Parenthood Executive Vice President Dawn Laguens said in a statement Friday.

Conservative groups FreedomWorks, Club for Growth and ForAmerica want leadership to accept an amendment from Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzJohn Boehner tells Cruz to 'go f--- yourself' in unscripted audiobook asides: report Huawei backs supply chain security standards in wake of SolarWinds breach The Memo: Biden faces first major setback as Tanden teeters MORE (R-Texas) that would allow insurers to sell plans that don’t comply with ObamaCare’s insurance regulations, as long as they also sell plans that do meet those rules.

“To get the base back on board with this bill, the Senate needs to adopt the recommendations put forth by those most trusted by the base like” GOP Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Key vote for Haaland's confirmation | Update on oil and gas leasing | SEC update on climate-related risk disclosure requirements Haaland on drilling lease moratorium: 'It's not going to be a permanent thing' Overnight Health Care: US surpasses half a million COVID deaths | House panel advances Biden's .9T COVID-19 aid bill | Johnson & Johnson ready to provide doses for 20M Americans by end of March MORE (Utah), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Health Care: 50 million coronavirus vaccines given | Pfizer news | Biden health nominees Rand Paul criticized for questioning of transgender health nominee Haley isolated after Trump fallout MORE (Ky.) and Cruz, says Bozell.

If not, Bozell said, “the movement will ensure our memberships are well aware. Our audiences are bigger, our reach is bigger, and our memberships are very much engaged."

The July Fourth holiday presents a unique opportunity for liberal advocacy groups looking to confront lawmakers. While many lawmakers have opted against hosting town halls, many will be holding public events or participating in parades over the recess.

Senate Republicans publicly opposed to their party’s first healthcare bill will probably feel the most pressure.

Krebs said GOP Sens. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (Nev.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGrassley to vote against Tanden nomination Murkowski undecided on Tanden as nomination in limbo Biden signs supply chain order after 'positive' meeting with lawmakers MORE (Ohio), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsHouse passes sweeping protections for LGBTQ people Grassley to vote against Tanden nomination Klain on Manchin's objection to Neera Tanden: He 'doesn't answer to us at the White House' MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWashington Post denounces abuse of reporter Grassley to vote against Tanden nomination Mean tweets may take down Biden nominee MORE (Alaska) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoPassage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Biden's unity effort falters Capito asks White House to allow toxic chemicals rule to proceed MORE (W.Va.) “will all hear from their constituents this coming week.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMinimum wage setback revives progressive calls to nix Senate filibuster Schiff sees challenges for intel committee, community in Trump's shadow McConnell says he'd back Trump as 2024 GOP nominee MORE (R-Ky.) delayed a vote planned for before the recess when it became clear he did not have the support from his own conference to move forward.

In seeking to cobble together 50 GOP votes, McConnell’s office has focused on centrists.

It has talked about eliminating the repeal of an investment tax, which would free up more money for tax credits for low-income families. It is also talking about putting more money in the bill to help people battling opioid addiction, a key issue for Portman and Capito.

Liberal groups mounting a pressure campaign don’t want those provisions to sway the centrist Republican senators.

GOP Sens. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGrassley to vote against Tanden nomination Klain on Manchin's objection to Neera Tanden: He 'doesn't answer to us at the White House' Tanden's path to confirmation looks increasingly untenable MORE (Ariz.), Cruz and Heller, all of whom are up for reelection next year, will all be targeted in new TV ads from the Progressive Change Campaign Committee that focus on the Senate bill’s cuts to Medicaid. A new analysis from the CBO released Thursday estimated that the Senate’s bill would cut Medicaid spending by 35 percent over the next 20 years.

In the ads, a mother of a child with cerebral palsy says she is worried about the proposed Medicaid cuts in the Senate’s health bill.

“I can’t afford Micah’s care if this bill passes,” the mother says.

“Look at her face. Tell me, Senator Cruz, what am I supposed to do?”

Indivisible, a nonprofit working to organize a progressive grassroots network across the country, is planning “non-stop calls” to congressional and district offices and “die-ins” to highlight what they say are the dangers of the Senate GOP bill.

“Our priority number one is making sure groups continue their pressure … doing everything we can to put pressure on senators,” said Angel Padilla, the group’s policy director.

Conservative groups will spend the recess pushing for more changes to the bill — besides calling for the changes advocated by Cruz, they will push back against a longer phaseout of ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion.