Kasich opposes revised Senate ObamaCare repeal bill

Kasich opposes revised Senate ObamaCare repeal bill
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Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) on Friday came out against the revised Senate ObamaCare replacement bill, urging Republicans to instead work with Democrats on a solution.

Kasich has been a strong defender of ObamaCare’s expansion of Medicaid in Ohio and pointed to the Medicaid cuts in the bill, which remain essentially unchanged from the initial version.

“The Senate plan is still unacceptable,” Kasich said in a statement. “Its cuts to Medicaid are too deep and at the same time it fails to give states the ability to innovate in order to cope with those reductions.”

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Kasich’s stance also puts pressure on his state’s Republican senator, Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTrump faces political risks in fight over GM plant GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE, who is one of the key votes on the bill and remains undecided on the new version.

A bipartisan group of governors stands ready to work on a healthcare solution, Kasich said.

“These shortcomings flow from the fact that the Senate plan commits the same error as Obamacare—it’s not bipartisan,” he said. “It fails to bring solutions from both sides to the table that can ensure we aren’t simply replacing one divisive plan with another.”

The views of governors are key in influencing undecided senators. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval (R) is particularly important in influencing Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (R-Nev.), who is up for reelection next year in a state Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGraham: McCain 'acted appropriately' by handing Steele dossier to FBI Why Mueller's hedge on obstruction decision was a mistake Giuliani says news media treat Dems better than GOP MORE won in the 2016 presidential election.

Sandoval said Thursday that his preliminary understanding of the new bill is that not much has changed, and therefore he is “greatly concerned” about it, according to CNN.

Two Republicans, Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all MORE (Maine) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHillicon Valley: Mueller delivers report, ending investigation | FEMA exposed info of 2.3M disaster survivors | Facebook asks judge to toss DC privacy lawsuit | Trump picks his first CTO | FCC settles lawsuit over net neutrality records Transparency advocate says government agencies face 'use it or lose it' spending Republicans need solutions on environment too MORE (Ky.), have already said they will vote against proceeding with the bill next week.