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Kasich opposes revised Senate ObamaCare repeal bill

Kasich opposes revised Senate ObamaCare repeal bill
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Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) on Friday came out against the revised Senate ObamaCare replacement bill, urging Republicans to instead work with Democrats on a solution.

Kasich has been a strong defender of ObamaCare’s expansion of Medicaid in Ohio and pointed to the Medicaid cuts in the bill, which remain essentially unchanged from the initial version.

“The Senate plan is still unacceptable,” Kasich said in a statement. “Its cuts to Medicaid are too deep and at the same time it fails to give states the ability to innovate in order to cope with those reductions.”

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Kasich’s stance also puts pressure on his state’s Republican senator, Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOn The Money: Trump to seek new round of tax cuts after midterms | Mnuchin meets with Saudi crown prince | Trump threatens to cut foreign aid over caravan On The Money: Mnuchin to attend anti-terror meeting in Saudi Arabia | Treasury releases guidance on 'opportunity zone' program | Maxine Waters gets company in new GOP line of attack Election Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms MORE, who is one of the key votes on the bill and remains undecided on the new version.

A bipartisan group of governors stands ready to work on a healthcare solution, Kasich said.

“These shortcomings flow from the fact that the Senate plan commits the same error as Obamacare—it’s not bipartisan,” he said. “It fails to bring solutions from both sides to the table that can ensure we aren’t simply replacing one divisive plan with another.”

The views of governors are key in influencing undecided senators. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval (R) is particularly important in influencing Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerGOP-affiliated voters outperforming Democrats in key states’ early voting: report Democrats slide in battle for Senate Biden: American values being 'shredded' under Trump MORE (R-Nev.), who is up for reelection next year in a state Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Bolton tells Russians 2016 meddling had little effect | Facebook eyes major cyber firm | Saudi site gets hacked | Softbank in spotlight over Saudi money | YouTube fights EU 'meme ban' proposal Dems lower expectations for 'blue wave' Election Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout MORE won in the 2016 presidential election.

Sandoval said Thursday that his preliminary understanding of the new bill is that not much has changed, and therefore he is “greatly concerned” about it, according to CNN.

Two Republicans, Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsManchin wrestles with progressive backlash in West Virginia Conservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns MORE (Maine) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPaul to Saudi government: 'It takes a lot of damn gall' to lecture US Congress raises pressure on Saudi Arabia The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says he is cutting foreign aid over caravan | Lawmakers point fingers at Saudi crown prince | DNC chair downplays 'blue wave' talk MORE (Ky.), have already said they will vote against proceeding with the bill next week.