Paul: I don't think McConnell has votes to pass healthcare bill now

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulConservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills Senate approves 4B spending bill Some employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report MORE (R-Ky.) on Sunday said he doesn't think Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKey GOP senators appear cool to Kavanaugh accuser's demand Trump hints at new executive action on immigration, wants filibuster-proof Senate majority The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump MORE (R-Ky.) has the votes to pass the Senate GOP's healthcare bill.

"I don't think right now he does," Paul, a vocal critic of the Senate's healthcare plan, said on "Fox News Sunday."

Paul said the real problem is that Republicans won elections on their promises to repeal ObamaCare.

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"But this bill keeps most of the ObamaCare taxes, keeps most of the regulations, keeps most of the subsidies," he said. "And creates something that Republicans have never been for, and that's a giant insurance bailout superfund."

Paul then again floated the idea of first repealing and later replacing ObamaCare. There is significant resistance to that idea among other senators, including Republicans, although the White House has indicated President Trump is open to it.

"What I've suggested to the president ... if this comes to an impasse, I think if the president jumps into the fray and says 'Look guys, you promised to repeal it, let's just repeal what we can agree to,'" Paul said.

"And then we can continue to try to fix, replace or whatever has to happen afterwards," he continued.

Republicans should try to repeal as many of the taxes, regulations and mandates as possible, Paul said.

Paul was later pressed on whether he would rather keep ObamaCare than pass the current GOP's healthcare legislation.

Paul said he thinks the current system is "terrible."

"The death spiral of ObamaCare is unwinding the whole system, and it will continue to unwind, but I don't think Republicans should put their name on this key part of ObamaCare," Paul said.

"And then we're going to be blamed for the rest of the unwinding of ObamaCare. It's a really bad political strategy and it's not going to fix the problem."

McConnell on Saturday announced Senate consideration of the healthcare legislation would be delayed while Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainArizona race becomes Senate GOP’s ‘firewall’ Trump administration weakens methane pollution standards for drilling on public lands Another recession could hit US in 2019, says credit union association chief MORE (R-Ariz.) recovers from surgery.