McCain calls for 'return to regular order' on ObamaCare repeal

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMeghan McCain to produce 'Don't Sweat the Small Stuff' Lifetime movie starring Heather Locklear An August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done Meghan McCain on Pelosi, McCarthy fight: 'I think they're all bad' MORE (R-Ariz.) said Monday night Congress should “return to regular order” to craft a replacement for ObamaCare.

“One of the major problems with Obamacare was that it was written on a strict party-line basis and driven through Congress without a single Republican vote. As this law continues to crumble in Arizona and states across the country, we must not repeat the original mistakes that led to Obamacare’s failure,” he said in a statement from Arizona, where he is recovering from surgery to remove a blood clot above his left eye.

“The Congress must now return to regular order, hold hearings, receive input from members of both parties, and heed the recommendations of our nation's governors so that we can produce a bill that finally provides Americans with access to quality and affordable health care.”

McCain’s statement comes after GOP Sens. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranSeven-figure ad campaign urges GOP to support infrastructure bill GOP skepticism looms over bipartisan spending deal Graham: Bipartisan infrastructure pay-fors are insufficient MORE (Kan.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThis week: Senate starts infrastructure sprint Senators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Biden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet MORE (Utah) announced on Monday night that they would not support taking up a bill repealing and replacing ObamaCare, effectively blocking the legislation. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Their decision means Republicans in the Senate are well short of having the support to pass their legislation and raises serious questions about whether President Trump will reach his goal of ending ObamaCare.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: Florida becomes epicenter of COVID-19 surge | NYC to require vaccination for indoor activities | Biden rebukes GOP governors for barring mask mandates McConnell warns Schumer cutting off debate quickly could stall infrastructure deal Top House Democrat says party would lose elections if they were held today: report MORE (R-Ky.) was also forced to delay a vote expected for this week after a surprise announcement that McCain would spend the week in Arizona recovering from surgery, depriving McConnell of the simple majority needed.