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Sanders plans to introduce single-payer bill in September

Sanders plans to introduce single-payer bill in September
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Outrage rises among liberals over Israel On The Money: Biden says workers can't turn down job and get benefits | Treasury launches state and local aid | Businesses jump into vax push Symone Sanders 'hurt' at being passed over for press secretary: report MORE (I-Vt.) plans to introduce his "Medicare for all" single-payer healthcare bill after Congress returns in September. 

Speaking to constituents in Vermont Monday, Sanders admitted that the bill is unlikely to pass the Republican-controlled Congress or be signed by President Trump. 

"If we pass this thing, it's not going to be tomorrow, it would be the most significant step forward legislatively since I suspect the creation of Social Security in the 1930s. It's a big deal," he said, according to The Associated Press

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Sanders has long argued in favor of a government-run universal healthcare system, commonly referred to as single-payer. It was included in his platform during his 2016 run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Single-payer has gained traction among Democrats, with potential 2020 contenders like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Memo: Outrage rises among liberals over Israel The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Infrastructure, Cheney ouster on deck as Congress returns Warren says she'll run for reelection to Senate MORE (D-Mass.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandAustin tight lipped on whether to take sexual assault cases out of commanders' hands Gillibrand touts legislation to lower drug costs: This idea 'is deeply bipartisan' A bipartisan effort to prevent the scourge of sexual assault in the armed forces MORE (D-N.Y.) supporting it. 

However, it's still not a unifying message for Democrats, with many cautious about the idea as they look to regain control of the House in the 2018 midterm elections. 

Senate Democrats face a tough electoral map next year, with a number of Democratic incumbents up for reelection in states that Trump won in 2016.