McConnell on last ditch ObamaCare repeal: Find the votes

McConnell on last ditch ObamaCare repeal: Find the votes
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Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOvernight Health Care: Opioids package nears finish line | Measure to help drug companies draws ire | Maryland ObamaCare rates to drop Overnight Health Care: HHS diverts funds to pay for detaining migrant children | Health officials defend transfers | Lawmakers consider easing drug company costs in opioids deal Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens MORE (R-La.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamKim, Moon toss ball to Trump in ‘last, best chance’ for Korean peace GOP senator: Kavanaugh accuser 'moving the goalposts' Collins: Kavanaugh accuser should 'reconsider,' testify on Monday MORE (R-S.C.) met on Tuesday afternoon with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP, Kavanaugh accuser struggle to reach deal GOP making counteroffer to Kavanaugh accuser The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump questions Kavanaugh accuser's account | Accuser may testify Thursday | Midterm blame game begins MORE (R-Ky.) to discuss their last-ditch ObamaCare repeal bill. 

Leaving the meeting in McConnell's Capitol office, Cassidy said the leader's message was that Graham and Cassidy need to find 50 votes for the bill on their own. 
 
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"He just says we need 50 votes," Cassidy said of McConnell. 
 
 
The effort faces a fast-approaching deadline of Sept. 30 before the fast-track authority to pass it with a simple majority expires. It comes after the GOP's stunning defeat of a prior effort by just one vote.
 
The bill would end funding for ObamaCare's subsidies and Medicaid expansion and convert those dollars into a block grant for states. Backers say this gives states more flexibility, while Democrats warn the block grants would be too small and would lead to cuts. 
 
"The Leader has said publicly and repeatedly that to move forward on anything we’ll need at least 50 votes," said McConnell spokesman Don Stewart, calling that a "consistent message."