Paul, Cassidy tweet back and forth on ObamaCare repeal bill

Paul, Cassidy tweet back and forth on ObamaCare repeal bill
© Keren Carrion

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard Paul'Live with it' is the new GOP response to COVID — but no, we can't do that Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads How conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide MORE (R-Ky.) on Friday shot down an attempt by Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyKoch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads How will American cities avoid economic catastrophe? Why drug costs for older Americans should be capped in pandemic's wake MORE (R-La.) to win over his support for a last-ditch plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare, arguing that the measure keeps too much of former President Obama's signature health care law.

In a brief exchange on Twitter that began with Paul accusing Cassidy's measure of being "Obamacare Lite," Cassidy argued that the bill would repeal the Affordable Care Act's "entire architecture," and offered to go over the legislation with the Kentucky senator.

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"No thanks," Paul replied in another tweet, asserting that the measure would preserve the vast majority of ObamaCare's taxes and spending. 

 

The exchange came as Cassidy and the bill's co-sponsors — Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says he will call Mueller to testify before Senate panel about Russia probe Romney blasts Trump's Stone commutation: 'Historic corruption' Lincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad MORE (R-S.C), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.) and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonSenate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads Romney, Collins, Murkowski won't attend GOP convention MORE (R-Wis.) — scramble to round up the 50 votes needed to pass the legislation before a Sept. 30 procedural deadline, after which Republicans will need 60 votes to avoid a Democratic filibuster.

Paul announced earlier Friday that he would not support the measure. 

The legislation would end ObamaCare funding to insurance companies for low-income patients and the Medicaid expansion. Instead, that funding would be converted into block grants for states.

President Trump met with the bipartisan Problems Solvers Caucus on Wednesday to discuss the possibility of backing an ObamaCare fix proposed by the group.