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The Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal

Three Republican senators oppose a last-ditch effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare, leaving the bill appearing dead.

Republicans need 50 votes to pass legislation from Sens. Bill CassidyBill CassidyUtah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Amazon blocks 10B listings in crackdown on counterfeits Cassidy on pipeline cyberattack: Congress must equip businesses with defenses against incursions MORE (R-La.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP governors move to cut unemployment benefits as debate rages over effects Trump critics push new direction for GOP Graham warns about trying to 'drive' Trump from GOP: 'Half the people will leave' MORE (R-S.C.) that would repeal much of the law and provide block grants for health-care funding to states. Leaders can afford no more than 2 GOP defections.

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRepublicans have dumped Reagan for Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (R-Ariz.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP lawmaker calls for Wuhan probe to 'prevent the next pandemic' All congressional Democrats say they have been vaccinated: CNN Fauci on Rand Paul: 'I just don't understand what the problem is with him' MORE (R-Ky.), and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans Masks shed at White House; McConnell: 'Free at last' MORE (R-Maine) have come out against the bill.

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Republican leaders are aiming for a vote the final week of September. Republicans face a Sept. 30 deadline to pass repeal using special budgetary rules that prevent a Democratic filibuster.

Every Democrat and independent is expected to vote against the bill.

Here’s a look at how votes are stacking up in the GOP.

The Hill will be updating this list as information comes in. Email mmali@thehill.com if you have updates to provide.

 

RECENT UPDATES: Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Susan Collins (R-Maine).

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This list was last updated on Sept. 25 at 6:13 p.m.

 

NO (3)

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — Collins came out against the bill moments after the CBO released its score on Monday.

“Health care is a deeply personal, complex issue that affects every single one of us and one-sixth of the American economy. Sweeping reforms to our health care system and to Medicaid can’t be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target," she said in a statement.

Many think she will run for governor of Maine, where a vote for repeal would be difficult to defend.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) — Paul backed his party in the July vote, but said Monday he won’t support the new legislation, which in his view doesn’t repeal enough of ObamaCare and could hurt some states.

“I’m kind of surprised this has been resurrected because I don’t think it has been fully thought through,” he told reporters.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) — McCain is opposed to Graham-Cassidy. “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal. I believe we could do better working together, Republicans and Democrats, and have not yet really tried," he said in a statement.

McCain has repeatedly been critical of the process used by the GOP on health care and also delivered the dramatic deciding vote against the GOP’s repeal effort in July.

McCain is close to Graham, one of the bill’s sponsors, and his home-state governor has endorsed the approach.

 

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UNDECIDED (13)

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans Infrastructure deal imperiled by differences on financing On The Money: Biden, Senate GOP take step toward infrastructure deal as other plans hit speed bumps MORE (R-W.Va.) — Capito hasn't expressed her position on the bill. She also previously had concerns about how the Senate GOP leadership's bill changed Medicaid and worked to net $45 billion for opioids abuse. 

“I’m trying to get the numbers for West Virginia,” Capito told Vox Thursday. "I think the flexibility piece is something that’s very attractive.”

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranBottom line Bottom line Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (R-Miss.) — A spokesman noted that Cochran hasn't commented on Graham-Cassidy. He previously voted for the Senate's last repeal and replace proposal, as well as partial repeal and "skinny" repeal. 

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate GOP to give Biden infrastructure counteroffer next week Biden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted MORE (R-Idaho) — A spokesman for Crapo told The Spokesman-Review that he is evaluating the legislation but "remains committed to fulfilling the promise of repealing and replacing Obamacare.”

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Seth Rogen says he's not in a feud with 'fascist' Ted Cruz, whose 'words caused people to die' GOP votes to replace Cheney with Stefanik after backing from Trump MORE (R-Texas): Cruz said Sunday he is currently a no but is open to changes that could win his support.

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"Right now they don't have my vote, and I don't think they have [Sen.] Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Energy: Colonial Pipeline says it has restored full service | Biden urges people not to panic about gasoline shortages | EPA rescinds Trump-era cost-benefit rule Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE's [R-Utah] either," he said.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin MORE (R-Wyo.) — A spokesman for Enzi said that he "generally does not announce beforehand how he will vote on legislation and he hasn’t on the Graham-Cassidy bill."

Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R-Colo.) — Gardner, the chairman of the Senate GOP campaign arm, told The Denver Post that he is "trying to get some more information on it" and looking at the numbers.

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler group targets Democrats with billboards around baseball stadium Warnock raises nearly M since January victory Five big takeaways on Georgia's new election law MORE (R-Ga.)  — Isakson told Vox that "I'm not a 'no,' but I'm not a 'yes' either."

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranBipartisan Senate bill introduced to give gyms B in relief Bottom line Hawley votes against anti-Asian hate crime bill MORE (R-Kan.) — Moran's office told The Topeka Capital-Journal that he "continues to have conversations with Kansans and his colleagues regarding Graham-Cassidy and reconciliation."

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate panel deadlocks over Biden pick to lead DOJ civil rights division Senate GOP dismayed by vote to boot Cheney Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (R-Alaska) — Murkowski has dodged questions on the bill, telling a small group of reporters Monday: “I need to figure out how all the numbers work with regards to Alaska.”

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She also indicated she would like a bipartisan process.

“We’re now having bipartisan hearings; I have applauded those,” she said, referring to an effort in the Senate Health Committee to stabilize the insurance marketplaces, which has since been killed.

“I always think that when you can get support for whatever the initiative from across the spectrum, it’s just better legislation,” she added.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanCarper urges Biden to nominate ambassadors amid influx at border Fudge violated the Hatch Act, watchdog finds House conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill MORE (R-Ohio) — Portman, like Capito, previously had concerns about how the Senate GOP leadership's bill changed Medicaid and worked to net $45 billion for opioids addiction. He said he's working to try to get more money in this bill for opioids addiction treatment, but thinks it isn't as crucial.

The extra money was needed in the previous repeal bill because "a lot of people would lose expanded Medicaid who are currently getting treatment." Portman said the Cassidy-Graham bill "is a little different because it keeps Medicaid expansion in place if a governor chooses to do so." 

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanHillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech Kerry denies allegations from leaked Iran tapes OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court considers whether US should pay for Guam hazardous waste cleanup | EPA eyes reversal of Trump revocation of California vehicle emissions waiver | Kerry faces calls to step down over leaked Iran tapes MORE (R-Alaska) — Sullivan split with his fellow Alaska Republican senator and backed a slimmed-down ObamaCare repeal bill on the floor in July.

The new bill could pull money away from Alaska, however, and like Murkowski, Sullivan is undecided.

"Still digging into it, trying to figure out all the backup of the dollar amounts, I'm trying to get more facts on it," he said Tuesday.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeySasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Philly GOP commissioner on censures: 'I would suggest they censure Republican elected officials who are lying' Toomey censured by several Pennsylvania county GOP committees over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.) — "Still thinking about it," Toomey told reporters Tuesday.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungSenate Democrats ramp up push to limit Biden's war powers US Olympic Committee urges Congress not to boycott Games in China Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (R-Ind.) — Young told CNN that he's "still thinking about it." 

 

LIKELY/LEANING YES (7)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderThe Republicans' deep dive into nativism Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality MORE (R-Tenn.) —  Alexander said he's reviewing Cassidy-Graham to see how it would impact his state but he's "always supported block grant plans that would give states more flexibility, in education, health care and other areas." 

 

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay Ernst Overnight Defense: Capitol security bill includes 1M to reimburse National Guard | Turner to lead House push against military sexual assault | Pentagon drops mask mandate GOP Rep. Turner to lead House push to address military sexual assault The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans MORE (R-Iowa) — Ernst told the Des Moines Register on Thursday that "I am leaning yes."

But it would be a surprise if Ernst voted "no" on the package.

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerMcCarthy and Biden haven't spoken since election Against mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden meets with bipartisan lawmakers for infrastructure negotiations MORE (R-Neb.) — Fischer told Fox News that she is reading through the bill, adding: "I think it’s a great model that the senators have come up with."

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyOn The Money: Biden says workers can't turn down job and get benefits | Treasury launches state and local aid | Businesses jump into vax push Grassley criticizes Biden's proposal to provide IRS with B The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Infrastructure, Cheney ouster on deck as Congress returns MORE (R-Iowa) — Grassley said he is still looking at the bill, but likes that it “returns powers to states and individuals.” 

“We need alternatives to ObamaCare, which hasn’t worked,” he said.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) The conservative seems likely to back the bill.

“Sen. Lee is very encouraged by the waiver provisions in the bill and we are working with Cassidy’s office on some technical changes,” his office emailed Tuesday morning.

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 Lobbying world MORE (R-Kan.) — Roberts told Vox that "restoring decision-making back to the states is always a good idea, but this is not the best possible bill — this is the best bill possible under the circumstances." 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey signs daylight savings bill Study: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Cheney poised to be ousted; Biden to host big meeting MORE (R-Fla.) — Rubio told McClatchy that “I’ve got to see some of the details on how it impacts Florida, but by and large returning power to the states is something I’ve long believed in." 

  
YES (25)

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted MORE (R-Wyo.) — Barrasso told MSNBC that "ObamaCare continues to fail the American people. ...The Republicans are looking to get the decisions and the money out of Washington." 

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMissouri Republicans move to block Greitens in key Senate race On The Money: Biden, Senate GOP take step toward infrastructure deal as other plans hit speed bumps Senate GOP to give Biden infrastructure counteroffer next week MORE (R-Mo.) — Blunt signed on to the bill last week, saying it would “provide better health care for Missourians.”

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanSenate GOP opens door to earmarks Arkansas governor quietly bucking GOP's dive into culture wars Trump allies line up ahead of potentially bruising primaries MORE (R-Ark.): A spokeswoman for Boozman told The Associated Press that he will support the legislation. 

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrGOP senator urges Biden to withdraw support for COVID vaccine patent waiver Utah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Battle lines drawn over Biden's support for vaccine waivers MORE (R-N.C.) — A spokeswoman for Burr told The Hill he supports it. 

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) — Cassidy is a sponsor of the bill and would get a great deal of credit if it passes the Senate.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-Tenn.) — "I like it, I do," Corker told The Hill on Tuesday. "It's not perfect, but it's better than where we are, and that's been my gauge."

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending Police reform talks hit familiar stumbling block CNN asks Carol Baskin to comment on loose Texas tiger MORE (R-Texas) — Cornyn has been whipping support from GOP senators over the health-care legislation, and a spokesman confirmed he will support it.

Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Opposition to refugees echoes one of America's most shameful moments White House defends CDC outreach to teachers union MORE (R-Ark.) — Cotton told The Washington Examiner on Tuesday that he supports the bill. “If it comes to the floor, I intend to vote for it,” he said. 

Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesGOP senator urges Biden to withdraw support for COVID vaccine patent waiver Overnight Energy: 5 takeaways from the Colonial Pipeline attack | Colonial aims to 'substantially' restore pipeline operations by end of week | Three questions about Biden's conservation goals House conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill MORE (R-Mont.) — Daines told the Billings Gazette that the new healthcare legislation could be good for Montana, which he argued is facing a fiscal "train wreck." 

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Republican reactions to Cheney's removal Flake: No greater offense than honesty in today's Republican Party Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (R-Ariz.) — Flake announced his support for the bill on Twitter on Sunday.

“#GrahamCassidy plan to #RepealAndReplace #Obamacare has my support. It ought to be brought to the senate floor.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) — Graham is another co-sponsor, and one who could have influence with McCain.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchFinancial market transactions should not be taxed or restricted Bottom line The Republicans' deep dive into nativism MORE (R-Utah) — Hatch told a local Utah TV station that he hopes the bill passes because ObamaCare "is a disaster for our country." 

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Lobbying World Democrats spend big to put Senate in play MORE (R-Nev.) — The most vulnerable Senate Republican up for reelection next year, Heller is a co-sponsor of the legislation.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP sees immigration as path to regain power The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults now eligible for COVID vaccines The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - All US adults can get vaccine; decision Friday on J&J vax MORE (R-N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that "based on our initial review of the legislation, we are supportive." 

Sen. Jim Inhfoe (R-Okla.) — Inhofe told Vox that Graham-Cassidy is "a stronger position for the states to be in, and generally, Republicans agree with that." 

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonAll congressional Democrats say they have been vaccinated: CNN Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart GOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending MORE (R-Wis.) — Johnson is a co-sponsor.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) — Kennedy told Vox that he was supporting the bill "because it gives states added flexibility." 

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordTop border officials defend Biden policies Rubio and bipartisan group of senators push to make daylight saving time permanent Senate inches toward COVID-19 vote after marathon session MORE (R-Okla.) — A spokesman confirmed that Lankford supports the legislation. 

Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Lawmakers reach agreement on bipartisan Jan. 6 commission The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans MORE (R-Ky.) — McConnell has touted the Graham-Cassidy bill including saying in a recent floor speech that it "would repeal the pillars of Obamacare and replace that failed law’s failed approach with a new one: taking decision-making power out of Washington, allowing states and governors to actually experiment with better ideas."

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) — Perdue told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that "I'm all in." 

Sen. Mike RoundsMike RoundsGOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending Democrats, GOP agree on one thing: They're skeptical of a deal Senate GOP keeps symbolic earmark ban MORE (R-S.D.) — Rounds told reporters on Monday that he supports the bill.

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Biden adds pressure to congressional talks with self-imposed deadlines Republicans can win back control in 2022 — if they don't 'cancel' themselves first MORE (R-S.C.): Scott said in a statement: "I'm on board — now let's go get the votes!"

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyBiden officials testify that white supremacists are greatest domestic security threat Republicans embrace Trump in effort to reclaim Senate Top Senate Democrat announces return of earmarks MORE (R-Ala.) — A spokeswoman confirmed that Shelby will support the legislation. 

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending Senate GOP dismayed by vote to boot Cheney Top Democrat: FCC actions are a 'potential setback' to autonomous vehicles MORE (R-S.D.) — Thune, the third-ranking GOP senator, backs the bill and said Cassidy is a “grave robber” for resurrecting something that was “6 feet under."

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSenate hears from Biden's high-profile judicial nominees for first time Senate Democrats take aim at 'true lender' interest rate rule Former North Carolina chief justice launches Senate campaign MORE (R-N.C.) — Tillis told McClatchy that while Graham-Cassidy doesn't completely solve the country's healthcare problems it "puts it on [a] footing that I think is more likely to get us to a solution, through other measures that are going to require 60 votes."