The Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal

Three Republican senators oppose a last-ditch effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare, leaving the bill appearing dead.

Republicans need 50 votes to pass legislation from Sens. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidySenators ask CBO to review options for preventing surprise medical bills Five things to watch for in Trump's 2020 budget Overnight Health Care - Presented by Kidney Care Partners - FDA chief Scott Gottlieb resigns | House Dems to take up drug pricing bills next week | Planned Parenthood, doctors group sue over Trump abortion rule MORE (R-La.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamConservation remains a core conservative principle Graham: McCain 'acted appropriately' by handing Steele dossier to FBI The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems eye next stage in Mueller fight MORE (R-S.C.) that would repeal much of the law and provide block grants for health-care funding to states. Leaders can afford no more than 2 GOP defections.

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGraham: McCain 'acted appropriately' by handing Steele dossier to FBI What should Democrats do next, after Mueller's report? Tom Daschle: McCain was a model to be emulated, not criticized MORE (R-Ariz.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHillicon Valley: Mueller delivers report, ending investigation | FEMA exposed info of 2.3M disaster survivors | Facebook asks judge to toss DC privacy lawsuit | Trump picks his first CTO | FCC settles lawsuit over net neutrality records Transparency advocate says government agencies face 'use it or lose it' spending Republicans need solutions on environment too MORE (R-Ky.), and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all MORE (R-Maine) have come out against the bill.

Republican leaders are aiming for a vote the final week of September. Republicans face a Sept. 30 deadline to pass repeal using special budgetary rules that prevent a Democratic filibuster.

Every Democrat and independent is expected to vote against the bill.

Here’s a look at how votes are stacking up in the GOP.

The Hill will be updating this list as information comes in. Email mmali@thehill.com if you have updates to provide.

 

RECENT UPDATES: Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Susan Collins (R-Maine).

This list was last updated on Sept. 25 at 6:13 p.m.

 

NO (3)

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) — Collins came out against the bill moments after the CBO released its score on Monday.

“Health care is a deeply personal, complex issue that affects every single one of us and one-sixth of the American economy. Sweeping reforms to our health care system and to Medicaid can’t be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target," she said in a statement.

Many think she will run for governor of Maine, where a vote for repeal would be difficult to defend.

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) — Paul backed his party in the July vote, but said Monday he won’t support the new legislation, which in his view doesn’t repeal enough of ObamaCare and could hurt some states.

“I’m kind of surprised this has been resurrected because I don’t think it has been fully thought through,” he told reporters.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) — McCain is opposed to Graham-Cassidy. “I cannot in good conscience vote for the Graham-Cassidy proposal. I believe we could do better working together, Republicans and Democrats, and have not yet really tried," he said in a statement.

McCain has repeatedly been critical of the process used by the GOP on health care and also delivered the dramatic deciding vote against the GOP’s repeal effort in July.

McCain is close to Graham, one of the bill’s sponsors, and his home-state governor has endorsed the approach.

 

UNDECIDED (13)

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoPence, GOP senators discuss offer to kill Trump emergency disapproval resolution Bipartisan think tank to honor lawmakers who offer 'a positive tenor' Trump tries to win votes in Senate fight MORE (R-W.Va.) — Capito hasn't expressed her position on the bill. She also previously had concerns about how the Senate GOP leadership's bill changed Medicaid and worked to net $45 billion for opioids abuse. 

“I’m trying to get the numbers for West Virginia,” Capito told Vox Thursday. "I think the flexibility piece is something that’s very attractive.”

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTop 5 races to watch in 2019 Bottom Line Races Dems narrowly lost show party needs to return to Howard Dean’s 50 state strategy MORE (R-Miss.) — A spokesman noted that Cochran hasn't commented on Graham-Cassidy. He previously voted for the Senate's last repeal and replace proposal, as well as partial repeal and "skinny" repeal. 

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoThis week: Congress set for next stage of Mueller probe fight On The Money: Trump reverses North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Trump to nominate Stephen Moore to Fed | Monthly deficit hits record 4 billion | IRS expands penalty relief for taxpayers Senate confirms Trump court pick despite missing two 'blue slips' MORE (R-Idaho) — A spokesman for Crapo told The Spokesman-Review that he is evaluating the legislation but "remains committed to fulfilling the promise of repealing and replacing Obamacare.”

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzNunes on Mueller report: 'We can just burn it up' 18 state attorneys general call on Justice Dept to release Mueller report Lawmakers clash over whether conclusion of Mueller investigation signals no collusion MORE (R-Texas): Cruz said Sunday he is currently a no but is open to changes that could win his support.

"Right now they don't have my vote, and I don't think they have [Sen.] Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeStop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over New Zealand coverage GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers MORE's [R-Utah] either," he said.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziGOP surprise raises new questions for Trump budget Senate GOP budget ignores Trump, cuts defense Progressives seek defense freeze in budget talks MORE (R-Wyo.) — A spokesman for Enzi said that he "generally does not announce beforehand how he will vote on legislation and he hasn’t on the Graham-Cassidy bill."

Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerConservation remains a core conservative principle How to stand out in the crowd: Kirsten Gillibrand needs to find her niche Overnight Defense: Trump to reverse North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Move sparks confusion | White House says all ISIS territory in Syria retaken | US-backed forces report heavy fighting | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan MORE (R-Colo.) — Gardner, the chairman of the Senate GOP campaign arm, told The Denver Post that he is "trying to get some more information on it" and looking at the numbers.

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonThis week: Congress set for next stage of Mueller probe fight Trump keeps up attacks on 'horrible' McCain, despite calls from GOP, veterans Crenshaw to Trump: 'Stop talking about McCain' MORE (R-Ga.)  — Isakson told Vox that "I'm not a 'no,' but I'm not a 'yes' either."

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget 12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration  MORE (R-Kan.) — Moran's office told The Topeka Capital-Journal that he "continues to have conversations with Kansans and his colleagues regarding Graham-Cassidy and reconciliation."

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRed dresses displayed around American Indian museum to memorialize missing, murdered native women Juan Williams: Don't rule out impeaching Trump The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (R-Alaska) — Murkowski has dodged questions on the bill, telling a small group of reporters Monday: “I need to figure out how all the numbers work with regards to Alaska.”

She also indicated she would like a bipartisan process.

“We’re now having bipartisan hearings; I have applauded those,” she said, referring to an effort in the Senate Health Committee to stabilize the insurance marketplaces, which has since been killed.

“I always think that when you can get support for whatever the initiative from across the spectrum, it’s just better legislation,” she added.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTrump faces political risks in fight over GM plant GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (R-Ohio) — Portman, like Capito, previously had concerns about how the Senate GOP leadership's bill changed Medicaid and worked to net $45 billion for opioids addiction. He said he's working to try to get more money in this bill for opioids addiction treatment, but thinks it isn't as crucial.

The extra money was needed in the previous repeal bill because "a lot of people would lose expanded Medicaid who are currently getting treatment." Portman said the Cassidy-Graham bill "is a little different because it keeps Medicaid expansion in place if a governor chooses to do so." 

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanRepublicans defend McCain amid Trump attacks Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget Pentagon chief calls reports of charges to allies erroneous: 'We won't do cost plus 50' MORE (R-Alaska) — Sullivan split with his fellow Alaska Republican senator and backed a slimmed-down ObamaCare repeal bill on the floor in July.

The new bill could pull money away from Alaska, however, and like Murkowski, Sullivan is undecided.

"Still digging into it, trying to figure out all the backup of the dollar amounts, I'm trying to get more facts on it," he said Tuesday.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (R-Pa.) — "Still thinking about it," Toomey told reporters Tuesday.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTrump UN pick donated to GOP members on Senate Foreign Relations panel Overnight Defense: Senate breaks with Trump on Yemen war | Shanahan hit with ethics complaint over Boeing ties | Pentagon rolls out order to implement transgender ban | Dem chair throws cold water on Space Force budget Senate breaks with Trump on Saudi-led war in Yemen MORE (R-Ind.) — Young told CNN that he's "still thinking about it." 

 

LIKELY/LEANING YES (7)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderRomney helps GOP look for new path on climate change GOP eager to exploit Dem court-packing fight Overnight Health Care: Senators seek CBO input on preventing surprise medical bills | Oversight panel seeks OxyContin documents | Pharmacy middlemen to testify on prices | Watchdog warns air ambulances can put patients at 'financial risk' MORE (R-Tenn.) —  Alexander said he's reviewing Cassidy-Graham to see how it would impact his state but he's "always supported block grant plans that would give states more flexibility, in education, health care and other areas." 

 

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstCrenshaw to Trump: 'Stop talking about McCain' Stop asking parents to sacrifice Social Security benefits for paid family leave Senate votes to confirm Neomi Rao to appeals court MORE (R-Iowa) — Ernst told the Des Moines Register on Thursday that "I am leaning yes."

But it would be a surprise if Ernst voted "no" on the package.

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerTrump approves Nebraska disaster declaration Nebraska lawmakers urge Trump to approve disaster funding 
College professor accused of vandalizing Nebraska GOP lawmaker's campaign signs MORE (R-Neb.) — Fischer told Fox News that she is reading through the bill, adding: "I think it’s a great model that the senators have come up with."

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTreasury expands penalty relief to more taxpayers Overnight Health Care: Senators seek CBO input on preventing surprise medical bills | Oversight panel seeks OxyContin documents | Pharmacy middlemen to testify on prices | Watchdog warns air ambulances can put patients at 'financial risk' Drug prices are a matter of life and death MORE (R-Iowa) — Grassley said he is still looking at the bill, but likes that it “returns powers to states and individuals.” 

“We need alternatives to ObamaCare, which hasn’t worked,” he said.

Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) The conservative seems likely to back the bill.

“Sen. Lee is very encouraged by the waiver provisions in the bill and we are working with Cassidy’s office on some technical changes,” his office emailed Tuesday morning.

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsPompeo jokes he'll be secretary of State until Trump 'tweets me out of office' Senators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law Kansas Senate race splits wide open without Pompeo MORE (R-Kan.) — Roberts told Vox that "restoring decision-making back to the states is always a good idea, but this is not the best possible bill — this is the best bill possible under the circumstances." 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump UN pick donated to GOP members on Senate Foreign Relations panel Nunes on Mueller report: 'We can just burn it up' 18 state attorneys general call on Justice Dept to release Mueller report MORE (R-Fla.) — Rubio told McClatchy that “I’ve got to see some of the details on how it impacts Florida, but by and large returning power to the states is something I’ve long believed in." 

  
YES (25)

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoTrump: Green New Deal 'the most preposterous thing' and 'easy to beat' This week: Trump set for Senate setback on emergency declaration We should end tax giveaways to electric vehicle owners MORE (R-Wyo.) — Barrasso told MSNBC that "ObamaCare continues to fail the American people. ...The Republicans are looking to get the decisions and the money out of Washington." 

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntRisk-averse Republicans are failing the republic Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks The Hill's Morning Report - Dems contemplate big election and court reforms MORE (R-Mo.) — Blunt signed on to the bill last week, saying it would “provide better health care for Missourians.”

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanGOP senators read Pence riot act before shutdown votes On The Money: Shutdown Day 26 | Pelosi calls on Trump to delay State of the Union | Cites 'security concerns' | DHS chief says they can handle security | Waters lays out agenda | Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions MORE (R-Ark.): A spokeswoman for Boozman told The Associated Press that he will support the legislation. 

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrTrump, Congress brace for Mueller findings GOP's Tillis comes under pressure for taking on Trump Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion MORE (R-N.C.) — A spokeswoman for Burr told The Hill he supports it. 

Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) — Cassidy is a sponsor of the bill and would get a great deal of credit if it passes the Senate.

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Brexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Tenn.) — "I like it, I do," Corker told The Hill on Tuesday. "It's not perfect, but it's better than where we are, and that's been my gauge."

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynConservatives wage assault on Mueller report Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks GOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 MORE (R-Texas) — Cornyn has been whipping support from GOP senators over the health-care legislation, and a spokesman confirmed he will support it.

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonSenate rejects border declaration in major rebuke of Trump Hillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction Senate votes to confirm Neomi Rao to appeals court MORE (R-Ark.) — Cotton told The Washington Examiner on Tuesday that he supports the bill. “If it comes to the floor, I intend to vote for it,” he said. 

Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesGreen New Deal vote tests Dem unity in Senate Hillicon Valley: Mueller delivers report, ending investigation | FEMA exposed info of 2.3M disaster survivors | Facebook asks judge to toss DC privacy lawsuit | Trump picks his first CTO | FCC settles lawsuit over net neutrality records JOBS for Success Act would recognize that all people have potential MORE (R-Mont.) — Daines told the Billings Gazette that the new healthcare legislation could be good for Montana, which he argued is facing a fiscal "train wreck." 

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP Schumer to introduce bill naming Senate office building after McCain amid Trump uproar Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (R-Ariz.) — Flake announced his support for the bill on Twitter on Sunday.

“#GrahamCassidy plan to #RepealAndReplace #Obamacare has my support. It ought to be brought to the senate floor.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) — Graham is another co-sponsor, and one who could have influence with McCain.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchThis week: Congress set for next stage of Mueller probe fight NY's political prosecution of Manafort should scare us all Congress must break its addiction to unjust tax extenders MORE (R-Utah) — Hatch told a local Utah TV station that he hopes the bill passes because ObamaCare "is a disaster for our country." 

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds MORE (R-Nev.) — The most vulnerable Senate Republican up for reelection next year, Heller is a co-sponsor of the legislation.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenDem lawmaker 'confident' bipartisan group will strike deal on border funding Congress in painful start to avoid second shutdown Republicans want Trump to keep out of border talks MORE (R-N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that "based on our initial review of the legislation, we are supportive." 

Sen. Jim Inhfoe (R-Okla.) — Inhofe told Vox that Graham-Cassidy is "a stronger position for the states to be in, and generally, Republicans agree with that." 

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonTrump UN pick donated to GOP members on Senate Foreign Relations panel Scott Walker considering running for Wisconsin governor or Senate: report GOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers MORE (R-Wis.) — Johnson is a co-sponsor.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) — Kennedy told Vox that he was supporting the bill "because it gives states added flexibility." 

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordSenate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks GOP senators eye 'nuclear' move to change rules on Trump nominees Senate GOP goes down to wire in showdown with Trump MORE (R-Okla.) — A spokesman confirmed that Lankford supports the legislation. 

Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems eye next stage in Mueller fight House Oversight Dem wants Trump to release taxes and 'get it over with' Senate rejection of Green New Deal won't slow Americans' desire for climate action MORE (R-Ky.) — McConnell has touted the Graham-Cassidy bill including saying in a recent floor speech that it "would repeal the pillars of Obamacare and replace that failed law’s failed approach with a new one: taking decision-making power out of Washington, allowing states and governors to actually experiment with better ideas."

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) — Perdue told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that "I'm all in." 

Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsGOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers Trump's emergency declaration looms over Pentagon funding fight Overnight Defense: Pentagon asked to house up to 5,000 migrant children | Judge lifts last injunction against transgender ban | Senators voice anger over problems with military housing | General warns ISIS waiting to resurge MORE (R-S.D.) — Rounds told reporters on Monday that he supports the bill.

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottSenate votes to confirm Neomi Rao to appeals court Breaking down barriers for American military families Top House Dem dismisses reparations as 2020 candidates endorse idea MORE (R-S.C.): Scott said in a statement: "I'm on board — now let's go get the votes!"

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyThis week: Congress set for next stage of Mueller probe fight Five takeaways from Trump's budget Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Trump unveils 2020 budget | Calls for cuts to NIH | Proposes user fees on e-cigs | Azar heads to Capitol to defend blueprint | Key drug price bill gets hearing this week MORE (R-Ala.) — A spokeswoman confirmed that Shelby will support the legislation. 

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneCongress should take action to stop unfair taxation of the digital economy The fear of colorectal cancer as a springboard for change Senators offer bipartisan bill to fix 'retail glitch' in GOP tax law MORE (R-S.D.) — Thune, the third-ranking GOP senator, backs the bill and said Cassidy is a “grave robber” for resurrecting something that was “6 feet under."

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (R-N.C.) — Tillis told McClatchy that while Graham-Cassidy doesn't completely solve the country's healthcare problems it "puts it on [a] footing that I think is more likely to get us to a solution, through other measures that are going to require 60 votes."