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Trump: Rand Paul 'negative force' on fixing health care

Trump: Rand Paul 'negative force' on fixing health care
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President Trump on Wednesday targeted Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulFauci says he puts 'very little weight in the craziness of condemning me' Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Rand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why MORE (R-Ky.) for being a "negative force" on health care.

"Rand Paul is a friend of mine but he is such a negative force when it comes to fixing healthcare. Graham-Cassidy Bill is GREAT! Ends Ocare!" he tweeted.

"I hope Republican Senators will vote for Graham-Cassidy and fulfill their promise to Repeal & Replace ObamaCare. Money direct to States!"

Paul has called the bill from Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Equilibrium — Presented by NextEra Energy — Tasmanian devil wipes out penguin population The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden support, gas tax questions remain on infrastructure This week: Senate set for voting rights fight MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyBill CassidyPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle MORE (R-La.) "ObamaCare lite" and said he wouldn't support it.

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The Graham-Cassidy bill seeks to give more power to states by converting money currently spent on ObamaCare’s subsidies and Medicaid expansion into block grants for states.

Earlier this week, Paul expressed concern that the Republicans' latest attempt to repeal ObamaCare might pass. 

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“There's a big groundswell of people pushing for this,” Paul told reporters on Monday. “Two weeks ago, I’d have said zero [chance it’ll pass], but now I’m worried.”

He said the bill "does not look, smell or even sound like repeal."

“I’m kind of surprised this has been resurrected, because I don’t think it has been fully thought through," he added.

He said the bill exists "mostly to take money from four Democratic states and redistribute it to Republican states."

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainHeatwaves don't lie: Telling the truth about climate change Overnight Energy: Lake Mead's decline points to scary water future in West | White House leads opposition to raising gas tax | Biden taps ex-New Mexico lawmaker for USDA post Lake Mead's decline points to scary water future in West MORE (R-Ariz.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Alaska) could decide the fate of the Republicans latest ObamaCare repeal effort.

The two were among the three Republicans, along with Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (R-Maine), who sunk the last GOP effort to repeal ObamaCare.

With Paul saying he is voting no and Collins thought to be a likely opponent, the bill would need either McCain or Murkowski to vote yes to pass, allowing Vice President Pence to break a 50-50 tie.