Collins: 'Disappointing' that bipartisan health-care effort was halted

Collins: 'Disappointing' that bipartisan health-care effort was halted
© Greg Nash

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsRosenstein faces Trump showdown Kavanaugh: I'm asking for a 'fair process' Collins: Second Kavanaugh accuser should speak with Senate panel under oath  MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday that it was "disappointing" a bipartisan health-care effort was halted after the White House threw its support behind a measure pushed by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Press: Judge Kavanaugh must withdraw Kavanaugh: 'I will not be intimidated into withdrawing' MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOvernight Health Care: GOP plays defense over pre-existing conditions | Groups furious over new Trump immigration proposal | Public health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Overnight Health Care: Opioids package nears finish line | Measure to help drug companies draws ire | Maryland ObamaCare rates to drop Overnight Health Care: HHS diverts funds to pay for detaining migrant children | Health officials defend transfers | Lawmakers consider easing drug company costs in opioids deal MORE (R-La.). 

In an interview with CNN, Collins said she had not yet decided whether she will vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, which seeks to end federal ObamaCare insurance subsidies and Medicaid expansion and replace them with block grants to states.

Collins said she is waiting for the Congressional Budget Office to release a partial analysis of the Graham-Cassidy bill before she makes a decision on it.

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But she acknowledged that she preferred an effort by the top Republican and Democrat on the Senate Health Committee to stabilize the individual insurance market and fix the problems with ObamaCare, rather than repeal it outright.

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: GOP plays defense over pre-existing conditions | Groups furious over new Trump immigration proposal | Public health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Health Committee, said Tuesday that the efforts had come to a standstill after Democrats and Republicans were unable to reach a deal that could pass in the Senate.

"It's disappointing that this bipartisan effort — which should be our approach — was not allowed to proceed to conclusion," Collins said.

In addition to Collins, Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPolice arrest 128 protesting Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill GOP launches counteroffensive on Kavanaugh Kavanaugh protesters descend on Collins, Flake offices on Capitol Hill MORE (R-Alaska) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCongress must use bipartisan oversight as the gold standard The Hill's Morning Report — Ford, Kavanaugh to testify Thursday as another accuser comes forward Trump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote MORE (R-Ariz.) are also said to remain undecided on the Graham-Cassidy bill. The three Republicans voted against a slimmed-down ObamaCare repeal bill in late July, throwing a wrench in the GOP's efforts to do away with the health-care law.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulA Senator Gary Johnson could be good not just for Libertarians, but for the Senate too Conservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills Senate approves 4B spending bill MORE (R-Ky.) has already indicated he will not vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, arguing that it does not go far enough to repeal ObamaCare