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Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition

Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition
© Greg Nash

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Friday praised Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainVan Hollen not interested in staying on as chair of Senate Dems' campaign arm Election Countdown: Lawsuits fly in Florida recount fight | Nelson pushes to extend deadline | Judge says Georgia county violated Civil Rights Act | Biden, Sanders lead 2020 Dem field in poll | Bloomberg to decide on 2020 by February Jeff Flake congratulates Kyrsten Sinema on win: ‘You’ll be great’ MORE's (R-Ariz.) announcement that he would not support the latest GOP effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare and pledged Democrats will "put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill."

In a letter to Democrats, Pelosi touted McCain's decision as "good news."

But she also cast Democrats' health-care fight against Republicans as ongoing, urging lawmakers and advocacy groups to keep pressure on GOP lawmakers and the discussion in front of the public.

"Together, we will finally put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill," Pelosi wrote.

The letter came after McCain said that he could not support a measure authored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham backs bill to protect Mueller Senate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle Election Countdown: Florida braces for volatile recount | Counties race to finish machine recount | Trump ramps up attacks | Abrams files new lawsuit in Georgia | 2020 to be new headache for Schumer | Why California counts its ballots so slowly MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyDyslexia is more common than society realizes. Here’s what we can do to help children struggling in the shadows. Congress must protect eye care patients from frightful prescriptions Trump signs bills banning drug pricing 'gag clauses' MORE (R-La.), which sought to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act by replacing certain provisions, like Medicaid subsidies, with block grants controlled by states.

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While several other Senate Republicans remain undecided, McCain's announcement dealt a potentially deciding blow to the proposal.

Republicans could only afford two defections on the bill to get the 50 votes necessary for it to pass. But Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSchumer’s headaches to multiply in next Congress GOP pollster says Republicans could break with Trump on Saudi Arabia Overnight Defense: Trump says 15,000 troops could deploy to border | Mattis insists deployment is not 'stunt' | Pompeo calls for Yemen peace talks in November MORE (R-Ky.) has already come out against the measure, and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDems vow swift action on gun reform next year Collins reiterates call for legislation to protect Mueller investigation GOP nerves on edge after Sinema takes lead over McSally MORE (R-Maine) has indicated that she's leaning against supporting it.

McCain's decision could potentially prompt other Senate Republicans to come out in opposition. No Democrats are expected to vote for the measure.

The Graham-Cassidy bill is the GOP's latest push to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare, though they now face a procedural deadline of Sept. 30 to pass the bill with only 50 votes, assuming Vice President Pence would cast the tie-breaking vote.

After that, any health-care bill would require a filibuster-proof 60 votes — a majority that would require Democratic support.