Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition

Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition
© Greg Nash

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Friday praised Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden's pick for vice president doesn't matter much Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Ernst calls for public presidential campaign funds to go to masks, protective equipment MORE's (R-Ariz.) announcement that he would not support the latest GOP effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare and pledged Democrats will "put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill."

In a letter to Democrats, Pelosi touted McCain's decision as "good news."

But she also cast Democrats' health-care fight against Republicans as ongoing, urging lawmakers and advocacy groups to keep pressure on GOP lawmakers and the discussion in front of the public.

"Together, we will finally put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill," Pelosi wrote.

The letter came after McCain said that he could not support a measure authored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump reviews Pelosi on morning TV: 'She wasn't bad' Encryption helps America work safely – and that goes for Congress, too Graham: Pelosi comment on Trump is 'most shameful, disgusting statement by any politician in modern history' MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTensions boil over on Senate floor amid coronavirus debate  Overnight Energy: Democratic lawmakers seek emissions reductions in airline bailout | House Dems warn Trump against oil industry bailout | GOP senators ask Saudis to stabilize oil market GOP senators ask Saudis to stabilize oil market MORE (R-La.), which sought to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act by replacing certain provisions, like Medicaid subsidies, with block grants controlled by states.

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While several other Senate Republicans remain undecided, McCain's announcement dealt a potentially deciding blow to the proposal.

Republicans could only afford two defections on the bill to get the 50 votes necessary for it to pass. But Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulMcConnell: Impeachment distracted government from coronavirus threat Warren knocks McConnell for forcing in-person Senate vote amid coronavirus pandemic House chairwoman diagnosed with 'presumed' coronavirus infection MORE (R-Ky.) has already come out against the measure, and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Campaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus Senate eyes quick exit after vote on coronavirus stimulus package MORE (R-Maine) has indicated that she's leaning against supporting it.

McCain's decision could potentially prompt other Senate Republicans to come out in opposition. No Democrats are expected to vote for the measure.

The Graham-Cassidy bill is the GOP's latest push to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare, though they now face a procedural deadline of Sept. 30 to pass the bill with only 50 votes, assuming Vice President Pence would cast the tie-breaking vote.

After that, any health-care bill would require a filibuster-proof 60 votes — a majority that would require Democratic support.