CBO finds 'millions' will lose coverage from repeal bill

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected Monday that the last-ditch GOP ObamaCare repeal bill would result in "millions" of people losing coverage. 

The agency did not give a specific number given a lack of time to do the analysis before a vote, but said the "direction of the effect is clear."

CBO said the reduction in coverage would be felt in three areas: in Medicaid, because the bill repeals ObamaCare's expansion of Medicaid; in private coverage, because the bill repeals subsidies that help people afford it; and because the mandate to have coverage would be repealed.

After the CBO analysis was released, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' MORE (R-Maine) told reporters she hoped senators could return to the bipartisan ObamaCare stabilization negotiations that were abruptly cut off last week.

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Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderThe next step for justice reform: Ending the ban on federal Pell Grants for eligible students behind bars Senate GOP poised to go 'nuclear' on Trump picks Overnight Health Care: Survey finds 1 in 10 ration medicines to lower costs | Senate Dems call for hearing on Trump abortion rule | Trump health chief backs needle exchanges | Outgoing FDA chief keeps heat on e-cig maker MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayWhite House proposes limits on student loan borrowing as part of higher education reforms Jury orders Johnson & Johnson to pay M to woman who claimed baby powder gave her cancer Overnight Health Care - Presented by Kidney Care Partners - FDA chief Scott Gottlieb resigns | House Dems to take up drug pricing bills next week | Planned Parenthood, doctors group sue over Trump abortion rule MORE (D-Wash.) were in the midst of negotiations on a bill to stabilize the insurance markets, until they were abandoned so Republicans could concentrate on one last repeal effort .

"I would hope that work would be resumed very quickly, and we could go on to other issues in the ACA," Collins said. 

CBO predicted some states would charge those who are sick more money for health coverage. 

 
"CBO and JCT also anticipate that some states would allow insurers to set premiums on the basis of an individual’s health status," the analysis states. 
 
"However, the higher the expected health care costs, the higher the premiums would be; for some people, premiums would be a very large share of their income."
 
The CBO finds that spending under the bill would be $230 billion less from 2020 to 2026 compared to ObamaCare. 
 
The new block grants to states that the bill creates would help offset the coverage losses, but only partially, CBO found. 
  
The bill also would reduce deficits by more than $133 billion over 10 years, the CBO found, clearing a hurdle in qualifying for special rules to avoid a filibuster.