FEATURED:

House conservatives won't back spending bill with ObamaCare payments

House conservatives won't back spending bill with ObamaCare payments
© Greg Nash

House conservatives said they won't support a short-term spending bill to fund the government if it contains provisions to "bail out" insurance companies. 

A deal between moderate GOP Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsManchin wrestles with progressive backlash in West Virginia Conservatives bankrolled and dominated Kavanaugh confirmation media campaign The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns MORE (R-Maine), President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellElection Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout Sanders: Democrats ‘absolutely’ have chance to win back rural America  Trump privately ready to blame Ryan and McConnell if Republicans lose midterms: report MORE (R-Ky.) would likely attach two bipartisan measures to stabilize ObamaCare's insurance markets to the spending bill in exchange for her vote on tax reform. 

But conservatives say that wouldn't pass the House. 

ADVERTISEMENT

"We haven't repealed ObamaCare, we haven't cut taxes yet, and we haven't started construction on the border security wall like we told the voters. But before we get any of that stuff done we're going to bail out insurance companies in the spending bill?" said Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanConservatives fume over format of upcoming Rosenstein interview Nellie Ohr exercises spousal privilege in meeting with House panels Meadows calls on Rosenstein to resign 'immediately' MORE (R-Ohio), the former chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. 

"For me, I think probably largely for many of our members, that doesn't make sense. I wouldn't be supportive of that." 

One of the measures, sponsored by Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderDems blast Trump rule changes on ObamaCare Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senate blocks Dem measure on short-term health plans | Trump signs bill banning drug price 'gag clauses' | DOJ approves Aetna-CVS merger | Juul ramps up lobbying Trump signs bills banning drug pricing 'gag clauses' MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: House passes funding bill | Congress gets deal on opioids package | 80K people died in US from flu last winter Wilkie vows no 'inappropriate influence' at VA Dems push back on using federal funds to arm teachers MORE (D-Wash.), would fund key ObamaCare insurer payments, called cost sharing reductions (CSR), for two years.

These payments reimburse insurers for giving discounted deductibles and copays to low-income patients but have been criticized by conservatives as a bailout of insurance companies. 

The other bill, sponsored by Collins and Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonElection Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout Poll: Nelson leads Scott by 6 points in Florida Senate race Poll: Nelson tied with Scott in Florida Senate race MORE (D-Fla.), would fund “reinsurance,” government funding to help pay for the costs of sick enrollees and bring down premium prices. 

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsConservatives fume over format of upcoming Rosenstein interview Farm bill negotiators should take advantage of the moment Conservative rep slams Rosenstein's 'conflicts of interest' MORE (R-N.C.) said he likely would not support a spending bill that contains the Alexander-Murray language unless it also includes more concessions from Democrats. And he definitely wouldn't support a spending bill that appropriates money for the reinsurance. 

"I don't see supporting a CR with Alexander-Murray attached to it," Meadows said. 

"I've been one willing to look at CSR payments as part of a transition but not with what Sen. Collins, who I respect — she's talking about reinsurance. That's actually adding more money to a failing system. It just doesn't work, and I think it would have a very high hurdle here in the House to pass." 

Collins, a key Senate vote on the tax bill, believes that the repeal of ObamaCare's individual mandate, included in the Senate tax bill, would raise premiums.

On Thursday, she said she had worked out a deal with Trump and McConnell to pass the two bipartisan bills in an effort to mitigate the effects of repealing the mandate, saying it would likely be added to the short-term spending bill. 

FreedomWorks, an influential conservative advocacy group, said it's "bad process" to attach Alexander-Murray to any spending bill. 

"We oppose Alexander-Murray and will urge members of the Senate and House to vote against it should it reach the floor," said Jason Pye, vice president of legislative affairs for the group. 

"This is a bailout for health insurance companies that participate on the ObamaCare exchanges."

A spokesperson for the conservative Republican Study Committee said it would have to see concrete details before making a decision. 

"The chairman has been on the record before that part of any deal on ObamaCare must include a permanent repeal of some sort," said Alexei Woltornist. 

"Conservatives are keeping in mind that the American people elected Republicans to repeal Obamacare, not bail it out."