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Bipartisan group of senators seek to block Trump cuts to drug discount program

Bipartisan group of senators seek to block Trump cuts to drug discount program
© Greg Nash

Six senators, including three Republicans, are asking GOP leadership to block a Trump administration rule that slashes funding for a federal drug discount program.

The program, called 340B, requires drug companies give discounts to health-care organizations that serve high volumes of low-income patients.

But a new rule from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which takes effect Jan. 1, cuts Medicare payments to hospitals enrolled in the program by $1.6 billion.

The senators are urging the cuts to be reversed in the year-end spending deal.

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"We recognize there are opportunities to strengthen the program through targeted clarifications and improvements to ensure it continues to fulfill its purpose with integrity and efficiency and are willing to work with stakeholders to find productive solutions in this space," the senators wrote in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop aide: Biden expected to visit Georgia in push to boost Ossoff, Warnock Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Richmond says GOP 'reluctant to stand up and tell the emperor he wears no clothes' MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerNew York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn Biden congratulates Pelosi on Speaker nomination Senate Democrats introduce bill to shore up PPE supply MORE (D-N.Y.). 

"However, with a January 1, 2018 start date and over half of the Senate and half of the House of Representatives having expressed concerns with CMS' rule, we request your help in ensuring the long-term sustainability of the 340B program by preventing these changes in an end of the year package."

Sens. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneDemocrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Overnight Defense: Pentagon set for tighter virus restrictions as top officials tests positive | Military sees 11th COVID-19 death | House Democrats back Senate language on Confederate base names Trump keeps tight grip on GOP amid divisions MORE (R-S.D.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanDemocrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Leadership changes at top cyber agency raise national security concerns Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities MORE (R-Ohio), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoHillicon Valley: Trump fires top federal cybersecurity official, GOP senators push back | Apple to pay 3 million to resolve fight over batteries | Los Angeles Police ban use of third-party facial recognition software OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee MORE (R-W.Va.), Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonThe Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 MORE (D-Fla.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinSenate Democrats reelect Schumer as leader by acclamation  Next Congress expected to have record diversity Infrastructure, energy investments urgently needed to create U.S. jobs MORE (D-Wis.) and Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSenate Democrats reelect Schumer as leader by acclamation  Bottom line Peters fends off challenge in Michigan Senate race MORE (D-Mich.) all signed the letter.

The request follows a letter 51 senators sent to CMS earlier this year expressing concerns over the changes.

Hospital groups argue the rule would jeopardize the ability to serve low-income patients.

The American Hospital Association, America's Essential Hospitals and the Association of American Medical Colleges are suing the administration to block the rule.

CMS has argued that the changes will increase access to care and lower out-of-pocket drug costs for Medicare beneficiaries.