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Senate Republicans look to address concerns about abortion language in ObamaCare bills

Senate Republicans look to address concerns about abortion language in ObamaCare bills
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Senate Republicans are looking for ways to ensure that two ObamaCare funding bills they're trying to pass don't put money toward insurance plans that cover abortions. 

"There were some questions that were raised in the pro-life community, and we want to make sure we get those addressed so that all conservatives feel comfortable voting for this transition out of ObamaCare, which is what this is all about," said Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsOn The Money: Deficit hits six-year high of 9 billion | Yellen says Trump attacks threaten Fed | Affordable housing set for spotlight in 2020 race Lawmakers, Wall Street shrug off Trump's escalating Fed attacks GOP shrugs off dire study warning of global warming MORE (R-S.D.). 

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Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senate blocks Dem measure on short-term health plans | Trump signs bill banning drug price 'gag clauses' | DOJ approves Aetna-CVS merger | Juul ramps up lobbying Trump signs bills banning drug pricing 'gag clauses' Senate defeats measure to overturn Trump expansion of non-ObamaCare plans MORE (R-Tenn.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret Collins'Suspicious letter' mailed to Maine home of Susan Collins The Kavanaugh debate was destructive tribalism on steroids: Here’s how we can stop it from happening again Conservative group launches ad campaign thanking Collins after Kavanaugh vote MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday they asked leadership not to bring their ObamaCare bills up for a vote this week after House Republicans demanded it include more abortion restrictions.

Those bills were likely going to be attached to a stopgap measure to fund the government through the next few weeks, but are now being punted to January as Congress runs up against a Friday deadline to avoid a shutdown. 

Now the bills might be added to a full-year funding bill in January, which gives Senate and House leaders more time to find a compromise.

"It probably was the right thing to do at this time. The reason is you have to have a product that can pass both the House and the Senate, and I think there were some concerns in the House based on some information that was provided that suggested some of those funds could be released for abortion services, which we didn't believe to be the case," said Rounds. 

"I'm pro-life. I don't want any of it used for abortion services, and that was never the intent. So if we can clarify that, get it cleared up, that makes it a whole lot easier for conservatives and pro-life members to be able to support it." 

Rounds mentioned that the issue could be resolved by an executive order signed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpKey takeaways from the Arizona Senate debate Major Hollywood talent firm considering rejecting Saudi investment money: report Mattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration MORE that would ban the funding from going toward plans that provide abortions. 

However, anti-abortion groups have been pushing for the ObamaCare bills to include language from the Hyde Amendment, a long-standing amendment reauthorized every year that bans Medicaid and other programs under the Health and Human Services Department from using federal funds for abortions.

House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Paul Ryan to campaign for 25 vulnerable House Republicans GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE (R-Wis.) told Republican members Tuesday the lower chamber would not be passing the ObamaCare bills without Hyde language. 

"There’s no stronger pro-life person than Paul Ryan. That’s never coming through here without Hyde language in it," said Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeGOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters Both sides digging in for post-midterm shutdown fight Conservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills MORE (R-Okla.) a Budget Committee member who is close to leadership.