Senate Republicans look to address concerns about abortion language in ObamaCare bills

Senate Republicans look to address concerns about abortion language in ObamaCare bills
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Senate Republicans are looking for ways to ensure that two ObamaCare funding bills they're trying to pass don't put money toward insurance plans that cover abortions. 

"There were some questions that were raised in the pro-life community, and we want to make sure we get those addressed so that all conservatives feel comfortable voting for this transition out of ObamaCare, which is what this is all about," said Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsDrug price outrage threatens to be liability for GOP Overnight Defense: Iran takes credit for rocket attack on US base | Trump briefed | Trump puts talk of Iraq withdrawal on hold | Progressives push to block funding for Iran war | Trump backs off threat to hit Iranian cultural sites McConnell to GOP on impeachment rules: I have the votes MORE (R-S.D.). 

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Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSchumer: Trump's team made case for new witnesses 'even stronger' The Hill's Morning Report — Dems detail case to remove Trump for abuse of power Senate Republicans confident they'll win fight on witnesses MORE (R-Tenn.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsKaine: GOP senators should 'at least' treat Trump trial with seriousness of traffic court Romney: 'It's very likely I'll be in favor of witnesses' in Trump impeachment trial Schumer: Trump's team made case for new witnesses 'even stronger' MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday they asked leadership not to bring their ObamaCare bills up for a vote this week after House Republicans demanded it include more abortion restrictions.

Those bills were likely going to be attached to a stopgap measure to fund the government through the next few weeks, but are now being punted to January as Congress runs up against a Friday deadline to avoid a shutdown. 

Now the bills might be added to a full-year funding bill in January, which gives Senate and House leaders more time to find a compromise.

"It probably was the right thing to do at this time. The reason is you have to have a product that can pass both the House and the Senate, and I think there were some concerns in the House based on some information that was provided that suggested some of those funds could be released for abortion services, which we didn't believe to be the case," said Rounds. 

"I'm pro-life. I don't want any of it used for abortion services, and that was never the intent. So if we can clarify that, get it cleared up, that makes it a whole lot easier for conservatives and pro-life members to be able to support it." 

Rounds mentioned that the issue could be resolved by an executive order signed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpKaine: Obama called Trump a 'fascist' during 2016 campaign Kaine: GOP senators should 'at least' treat Trump trial with seriousness of traffic court Louise Linton, wife of Mnuchin, deletes Instagram post in support of Greta Thunberg MORE that would ban the funding from going toward plans that provide abortions. 

However, anti-abortion groups have been pushing for the ObamaCare bills to include language from the Hyde Amendment, a long-standing amendment reauthorized every year that bans Medicaid and other programs under the Health and Human Services Department from using federal funds for abortions.

House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Hill's Morning Report — Dems detail case to remove Trump for abuse of power Social security emerges as latest flash point in Biden-Sanders tussle Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders for 'inability to actually fight with bad actors' in party MORE (R-Wis.) told Republican members Tuesday the lower chamber would not be passing the ObamaCare bills without Hyde language. 

"There’s no stronger pro-life person than Paul Ryan. That’s never coming through here without Hyde language in it," said Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeDemocrats don't expect to do 2020 budget The Hill's Morning Report — Impeachment face-off; Dems go after Buttigieg in debate Trump shocks, earns GOP rebukes with Dingell remarks MORE (R-Okla.) a Budget Committee member who is close to leadership.