Budget deal includes $6 billion to fight opioid abuse

Budget deal includes $6 billion to fight opioid abuse
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A bipartisan Senate budget deal includes $6 billion for opioid addiction and mental health, Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden discusses agenda with Schumer, Pelosi ahead of pivotal week CEOs urge Congress to raise debt limit or risk 'avoidable crisis' If .5 trillion 'infrastructure' bill fails, it's bye-bye for an increasingly unpopular Biden MORE (D-N.Y.) said.

Advocates have been calling for more funding to combat the increasing deaths from opioid overdoses, which are now killing more Americans than car accidents.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell'Justice for J6' rally puts GOP in awkward spot Republicans keep distance from 'Justice for J6' rally House to act on debt ceiling next week MORE (R-Ky.) and Schumer announced the deal on the Senate floor Wednesday afternoon.

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“This agreement will also bolster our ongoing national struggle against opioid addiction and substance abuse,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “It will fund new grants, prevention programs and law enforcement efforts in vulnerable communities all across our country.”

In late October, President TrumpDonald TrumpKinzinger says Trump 'winning' because so many Republicans 'have remained silent' Our remote warfare counterterrorism strategy is more risk than reward Far-right rally draws small crowd, large police presence at Capitol MORE declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, a move the administration extended another 90 days in mid-January. The move didn’t free up millions of dollars, nor did it include a funding ask to Congress.

Many advocates and Democrats have criticized the measure as not having much of an impact to date, arguing more funding is needed.

New Hampshire Democratic Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSenate lawmakers let frustration show with Blinken We have a plan that prioritizes Afghanistan's women — we're just not using it Scott Brown's wife files to run for Congress MORE and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanOvernight Hillicon Valley — Majority supports national data privacy standards, poll finds Senator calls on agencies to take action to prevent criminal cryptocurrency use Trump praises NH Senate candidate as Sununu weighs own bid MORE introduced a proposal in January to provide $25 billion to the opioid epidemic over two years.

Passed in 2016, the 21st Century Cures bill provided $1 billion over two years in state grants to fight the opioid epidemic.

The opioid crisis has hit both urban and rural communities across the country, and overdose deaths increased nearly 28 percent between 2015 and 2016, according to December data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.