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Budget deal includes $6 billion to fight opioid abuse

Budget deal includes $6 billion to fight opioid abuse
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A bipartisan Senate budget deal includes $6 billion for opioid addiction and mental health, Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns McConnell says deficits 'not a Republican problem' Medicare for All is disastrous for American seniors and taxpayers MORE (D-N.Y.) said.

Advocates have been calling for more funding to combat the increasing deaths from opioid overdoses, which are now killing more Americans than car accidents.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Poll finds Dems prioritize health care, GOP picks lower taxes when it's time to vote The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan MORE (R-Ky.) and Schumer announced the deal on the Senate floor Wednesday afternoon.

“This agreement will also bolster our ongoing national struggle against opioid addiction and substance abuse,” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “It will fund new grants, prevention programs and law enforcement efforts in vulnerable communities all across our country.”

In late October, President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Guardian slams Trump over comments about assault on reporter Five takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Watchdog org: Tillerson used million in taxpayer funds to fly throughout US MORE declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, a move the administration extended another 90 days in mid-January. The move didn’t free up millions of dollars, nor did it include a funding ask to Congress.

Many advocates and Democrats have criticized the measure as not having much of an impact to date, arguing more funding is needed.

New Hampshire Democratic Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenBrunson release spotlights the rot in Turkish politics and judiciary Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Missing journalist strains US-Saudi ties | Senators push Trump to open investigation | Trump speaks with Saudi officials | New questions over support for Saudi coalition in Yemen Senators demand answers on Trump administration backing of Saudi coalition in Yemen MORE and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanElection Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms Former Dem aide makes first court appearance on charges of posting GOP senators' info online Ex-House intern charged with 'doxing' GOP senators during Kavanaugh hearing MORE introduced a proposal in January to provide $25 billion to the opioid epidemic over two years.

Passed in 2016, the 21st Century Cures bill provided $1 billion over two years in state grants to fight the opioid epidemic.

The opioid crisis has hit both urban and rural communities across the country, and overdose deaths increased nearly 28 percent between 2015 and 2016, according to December data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.