Senate panel to consider ban on prescription drug 'gag clauses'

Senate panel to consider ban on prescription drug 'gag clauses'
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The Senate health committee plans to vote on a bill next month banning "gag clauses" that can hide potential savings on prescriptions from consumers at the pharmacy counter. 

Committee Chairman Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderGOP braces for impeachment brawl McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows GOP senator: 'Inappropriate' to discuss opponents, but impeachment a 'mistake' MORE (R-Tenn.) said Tuesday he hopes the panel will vote on the bill, authored by Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (R-Maine), June 20. 

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Specifically, Collins's bill would ban clauses in contracts between pharmacies, insurers and middle men that keep pharmacies from proactively telling customers they could save money on a prescription if they paid out of pocket instead of through insurance. 

It would apply to plans offered through the individual market and by private employers. 

recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association that reviewed 9.5 million insurance claims found that 23 percent of prescriptions filled through insurance ended up costing more for customers than if they would have paid out of pocket.

The study noted that some pharmacists are contractually prevented from alerting patients when their copay exceeds the drug's out-of-pocket price.

Alexander said the committee also hopes to vote on a bill addressing rising maternal mortality deaths in the U.S., and other health related bills next month, but noted compromise will be necessary. 

"These are important pieces of legislation, and again, we would hope to mark them up on the 20th, but it would take some cooperation and compromise between now and then to do it," Alexander said.