House panel advances bill that would temporarily halt ObamaCare's employer mandate

House panel advances bill that would temporarily halt ObamaCare's employer mandate
© Getty Images

The House Ways and Means Committee on Thursday approved legislation that would chip away at ObamaCare, including a measure that would temporarily repeal the law's employer mandate. 

The bill sponsored by GOP Reps. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesVoters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November Sunday shows preview: With coronavirus cases surging, lawmakers and health officials weigh in Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE (Calif.) and Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyHillicon Valley: Livestreaming service Twitch suspends Trump account | Reddit updates hate speech policy, bans subreddits including The_Donald | India bans TikTok Trump campaign sues Pennsylvania, county election boards over mail-in voting Pelosi asks House chairs to enforce mandatory mask-wearing during hearings MORE (R-Pa.) would suspend penalties for the employer mandate for 2015 through 2019 and delay implementation of the tax on high-cost employer-sponsored health plans for another year, pushing it back to 2022.

ADVERTISEMENT

 

Congress repealed the penalty associated with the individual mandate last year, but it doesn't take effect until 2019.

"I think it's fair, if we relieve the burden for individuals, that we stand with our small and mid-sized companies," Kelly said.

Powerful lobbying groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have pushed for a repeal of the employer mandate.

The other measure, sponsored by Reps. Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamBottom line Lobbying world House votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap MORE (R-Ill.) and Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessTechnical difficulties mar several remote House hearings The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Moniz says U.S. needs energy jobs coalition and Manchin says Congress is pushing Wall Street solutions that don't work for Main Street; Burr to step aside The Hill's 12:30 Report: House returns to DC for coronavirus relief MORE (R-Texas), would allow the use of ObamaCare's tax credits for plans outside of the exchanges in the individual market. It would also allow anyone to purchase a catastrophic plan — plans that are cheaper but cover fewer services and are currently only available for those under the age of 30.

The bill "provides a much needed offramp for pressure people are feeling right no in terms of premiums increases and limited choices," Roskam said.

Both measures advanced on party-line votes.

Democrats opposed the bills, saying they would cost too much and destabilize ObamaCare.