Senate Dems to force vote to block non-ObamaCare insurance plans

Senate Dems to force vote to block non-ObamaCare insurance plans
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Top Senate Democrats said they are planning to force a vote on a measure that would overturn the Trump administration’s rule expanding access to cheap, controversial insurance plans.

The resolution of disapproval will be introduced by Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinDems offer smaller step toward ‘Medicare for all' Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Powerful House committee turns to drug pricing | Utah governor defies voters on Medicaid expansion | Dems want answers on controversial new opioid Why does the bankruptcy code discriminate against disabled veterans? MORE (D-Wis.). During a call with reporters Thursday, Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said he thinks there will be unanimous support among Democrats once the resolution is introduced.

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The measure will only require 51 votes to pass, which would mean that in Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal Mark Kelly launches Senate bid in Arizona MORE's (R-Ariz.) absence the backers need to recruit one Republican to their cause.

“All it takes is one or two Republicans who claim to support preexisting condition protections,” Schumer said.

The resolution aims to overturn the Trump administration’s new rule that expands access to non-ObamaCare insurance plans.

The administration touts these plans because they offer lower premiums for healthy people, but the plans don’t need to follow ObamaCare rules, meaning they can charge people with preexisting conditions higher premiums and leave out coverage of certain health services.

Democrats attack the plans as “junk” insurance and say the move is part of the administration’s efforts to “sabotage” ObamaCare.

“We cannot let the Trump administration and big insurance companies rewrite the rules on the guaranteed health-care protections that people depend on,” Baldwin said.

In June, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' Winners and losers in the border security deal House passes border deal, setting up Trump to declare emergency MORE (R-Ky.) said "everybody" in the Senate wants to maintain protections for people with preexisting conditions.

“There is no difference in opinion about that whatsoever," McConnell said.

By forcing a vote on overturning the rule, Schumer said Americans will be able to see whether Republicans really support the estimated 130 million Americans with preexisting conditions, or if they were just paying lip-service.

“This is an issue [where] the American people should know where everyone stands,” Schumer said. “McConnell said he thinks all Republicans are for it. So rather than say it, let him show it.”

Since the resolution will be introduced under the Congressional Review Act, Republicans can’t block it. Schumer noted Democrats had success with a similar resolution to override the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to repeal net neutrality rules.

After the rule takes effect, lawmakers have a window of 60 legislative days to reverse the move under the Congressional Review Act.

The measure must still survive the Republican-majority House and be signed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpBill Kristol resurfaces video of Pence calling Obama executive action on immigration a 'profound mistake' ACLU says planned national emergency declaration is 'clear abuse of presidential power' O'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could MORE to take effect.