Dem Arizona Senate candidate opposes Medicare for All

Dem Arizona Senate candidate opposes Medicare for All
© Greg Nash

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), the likely Democratic nominee for Senate in Arizona, says that she does not support Medicare for All.

“I do not support Medicare for All,” Sinema told reporters in video posted by NBC reporter Vaughn Hillyard on Wednesday. “I'm really focused on solutions that are realistic and pragmatic and we can get done.”

Sinema’s centrist stance breaks with the more progressive wing of the party that is rallying around the Medicare for All idea championed by Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBiden team discussed 2020 run with O'Rourke as VP: report Teen quits job at Walmart over intercom, tears into company over employee treatment O'Rourke doubles support in CNN poll of Dem presidential race MORE (I-Vt.).

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Sinema has taken other steps to position herself as centrist, including saying that she would not vote for Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerRetired Gen. McChrystal: Sending troops to build wall could be seen as ‘misuse of power’ ‘It’s called transparency’ works for Trump on TV, not so much on campaign finance Trump, Pelosi, Schumer: No adult in the room MORE (D-N.Y.) as Democratic leader.

The Arizona race is one of a handful of pivotal races that will determine control of the Senate next year.

The Republican primary on Tuesday will determine whom Sinema faces, establishment favorite Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyArizona governor eyes several possible Kyl replacements The Hill's 12:30 Report – Cohen says Trump knew payments were wrong | GOP in turmoil over Trump shutdown threat | Kyl to resign from Senate at year's end Jon Kyl to resign from Senate on Dec. 31 MORE (R-Ariz.), or candidates Kelli Ward and Joe Arpaio, who are further to the right.

Sinema also told reporters that parts of ObamaCare are not working. “There's a long list of stuff that's good, there's also a big pile of stuff that's bad,” she said.

Arizona has had particularly high premium increases in recent years.

“The exchanges are not working in Arizona,” she said. “We've had some of the highest increases in the last couple years and frankly it's just not affordable for most Arizonans.”

She said she wants to keep the parts that work and fix what does not in ObamaCare. She cited Medicaid expansion and protections for people with pre-existing conditions as parts of the law that are working.