Senate Dems to force vote this week to overrule Trump ObamaCare change

Senate Dems to force vote this week to overrule Trump ObamaCare change

Democrats are planning to force a vote in the Senate this week on overturning a Trump administration rule expanding non-ObamaCare insurance plans.

The Democratic resolution, which will likely get a vote on Wednesday, would overturn a rule finalized in August that expanded the availability of short-term health insurance plans.

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Democrats decry the plans as “junk” insurance because they does not need to cover pre-existing conditions or follow other ObamaCare rules. Republicans argue the plans provide a cheaper option alongside ObamaCare plans.

The resolution, which is supported by all 49 Senate Democrats, is unlikely to pass given that it would need 51 votes, although GOP Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Hillicon Valley: Facebook removes Trump post | TikTok gets competitor | Lawmakers raise grid safety concerns MORE (Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCoronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority From a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's visit to battleground Ohio overshadowed by coronavirus MORE (Maine), who broke with their party on health care last year, have not publicly said how they will vote.

Even a failed vote, however, would allow Democrats to hammer Republicans on the issue of pre-existing conditions, which they have made central to the campaign ahead of next month’s midterm elections.

Democrats point out that the short-term health insurance plans can deny people who have pre-existing conditions.

The rule in question, finalized by the Trump administration in August, lifts restrictions that limited short-term plans to a duration of three months. Under the new rules, short-term plans can last up to a year, which critics say makes them not actually “short-term” at all.

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinDemocrats try to force Trump to boost medical supplies production Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Biden: I'll have a running mate picked next week MORE (D-Wis.), who is up for reelection this year, is the main sponsor of the resolution.