Senate Dems to force vote this week to overrule Trump ObamaCare change

Senate Dems to force vote this week to overrule Trump ObamaCare change

Democrats are planning to force a vote in the Senate this week on overturning a Trump administration rule expanding non-ObamaCare insurance plans.

The Democratic resolution, which will likely get a vote on Wednesday, would overturn a rule finalized in August that expanded the availability of short-term health insurance plans.

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Democrats decry the plans as “junk” insurance because they does not need to cover pre-existing conditions or follow other ObamaCare rules. Republicans argue the plans provide a cheaper option alongside ObamaCare plans.

The resolution, which is supported by all 49 Senate Democrats, is unlikely to pass given that it would need 51 votes, although GOP Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann Murkowski The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Overnight Energy: Trump administration to repeal waterway protections| House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge| Administration takes key step to open Alaskan refuge to drilling by end of year Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare MORE (Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret Collins The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Congress passes bill to begin scenic byways renaissance Senators say Trump open to expanding background checks MORE (Maine), who broke with their party on health care last year, have not publicly said how they will vote.

Even a failed vote, however, would allow Democrats to hammer Republicans on the issue of pre-existing conditions, which they have made central to the campaign ahead of next month’s midterm elections.

Democrats point out that the short-term health insurance plans can deny people who have pre-existing conditions.

The rule in question, finalized by the Trump administration in August, lifts restrictions that limited short-term plans to a duration of three months. Under the new rules, short-term plans can last up to a year, which critics say makes them not actually “short-term” at all.

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinFederal funding for Chinese buses risks our national security Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall The Trump downturn: Trouble ahead for the US economy MORE (D-Wis.), who is up for reelection this year, is the main sponsor of the resolution.