Trump health official says agency would never have supported family separations

Trump health official says agency would never have supported family separations
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A top Trump administration health official on Thursday told lawmakers neither he nor anyone at his agency responsible for migrant children would ever have supported a policy to force family separations.

“Neither I nor any career person ... would ever have supported such a policy proposal,” Jonathan White, a commander in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, said during a House subcommittee hearing.

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White, who is in charge of reunifying separated children with their families, told lawmakers he raised concerns with his superiors months before an official policy was implemented.

He said family separation would be inconsistent with the agency’s legal requirement to act in the best interests of children.

White said he was kept in the dark about the administration’s intent and would never have supported a policy to separate families.

White's appearance before the House Energy and Commerce oversight subcommittee was the first of what is likely to be many hearings, as Democrats investigate the Trump administration's policy to separate thousands of children from their parents or guardians.

House Democrats during the hearing blasted the administration for its “zero tolerance” policy along the southern border.

Democrats accused the administration of cruel and inhumane acts and faulted health officials for not opposing the policy.

Subcommittee chairwoman Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGetteOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Powerful House committee turns to drug pricing | Utah governor defies voters on Medicaid expansion | Dems want answers on controversial new opioid Dem chair asks FDA for documents on powerful new opioid Trump health official says agency would never have supported family separations MORE (D-Colo.) said even though the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) did not separate children, “there is no evidence that HHS leaders ever tried to stop this abhorrent policy.”

“The policy itself was inhumane on a fundamental level,” said Energy and Commerce Committee chairman Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Lawmakers pay tribute to John Dingell's legacy on health care | White House denies officials are sabotaging ObamaCare | FDA wants meeting with Juul, Altria execs on youth vaping Hillicon Valley: Dems ready to subpoena Trump Tower meeting phone records | Dems, Whitaker in standoff over testimony | Bezos accuses National Enquirer of 'extortion' | Amazon offers rules for facial recognition | Apple releases FaceTime fix Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Trump official says agency would not have supported family separations | 2020 Dems walk fine line on 'Medicare for all' | Advocates skeptical of Trump AIDS pledge | Johnson and Johnson to show drug prices on TV MORE (D-N.J.).  “Family separations can never be done humanely.”

Committee Republicans also stressed their opposition to family separations.

“While I support strong enforcement of our nation’s borders, I want to make something very clear — I support keeping families together, and strongly believe that children should not be separated from their parents,” said the committee’s top Republican, Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenFormer Ryan aide moves to K street Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Lawmakers pay tribute to John Dingell's legacy on health care | White House denies officials are sabotaging ObamaCare | FDA wants meeting with Juul, Altria execs on youth vaping House members hint at bipartisan net neutrality bill MORE (Ore.).

The hearing comes after a report from the HHS inspector general that found the Trump administration separated thousands more migrant children from their parents than was previously known. Those separations occurred before the “zero tolerance” policy was implemented.

The policy from then-Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMcCabe book: Sessions once said FBI was better off when it 'only hired Irishmen' Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general Rod Rosenstein’s final insult to Congress: Farewell time for reporters but not testimony MORE called for the criminal prosecution of all adult migrants who were detained after trying to cross the country’s southern border.

Any children brought across the border were separated from their parents, deemed to be “unaccompanied” and detained by the HHS refugee office in facilities sometimes hundreds of miles from their parents.

The policy, publicly announced in April, created a massive outcry, and the backlash forced the administration to walk it back three months later.

More than 2,600 children remained separated from their parents when a federal court ordered the administration to reunite them. The policy was reportedly written to deter border crossings.

HHS Secretary Alex Azar declined to testify at the hearing.