More teens defy parents, get vaccinated amid measles outbreak

A number of adult teenagers are deciding to share their choice to get vaccinated after their parents initially chose not to get them vaccinations as children.

After 18-year-old Ethan Lindenberger’s decision to receive his first-ever vaccinations despite his parents' wishes went viral, more reports are surfacing of other teens doing the same.

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NBC News reports that Mayci, an 18-year-old from Georgia, took to the internet last week to better understand vaccinations for diseases such as measles and chickpox, which can largely be prevented by vaccinations.

“At the time I was born, both of my parents agreed on anti-vaccination,” Mayci, who asked that her last name not be included, told NBC News. “Almost a year and a half ago, I moved out of my mother's house and in with my dad. My dad has a pretty neutral view on vaccinations, but when I was born he essentially just agreed with my mom and her family's beliefs.”

Mayci said she decided to get a vaccination when she turned 18, which is the age when consent of a parent or guardian is no longer needed for a medical procedure.

So far Mayci has received the tetanus vaccine and flu shot and said she plans to get her Hepatitis A and B as well as her chickenpox vaccine.

“The fact that I work in a doctor's office has allowed me to really become educated on the myths and truths about vaccines," she said.

Lindenberger told ABC News in an interview on “Good Morning America” that several others have reached out to him since hearing of his story.

“I definitely have received messages and I’ve had people contact me that are in a similar situation where they want to pursue vaccinations and their parent or authority figure doesn’t believe it’s right,” he said.

 

The anti-vaccination movement has received increased attention recently amid reports of a measles outbreak in Washington state.

The outbreak lead officials to declare a public health emergency.

Ten states in total have reported measles outbreaks this year, according to the Center for Disease Control.