FDA warns against infusing young people's blood to fight aging

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning against buying young people’s blood in an attempt to fight aging and other diseases.

“Simply put, we’re concerned that some patients are being preyed upon by unscrupulous actors touting treatments of plasma from young donors as cures and remedies,” the FDA said in a statement on Tuesday.

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For example, a company called Ambrosia charges $8,000 for people to receive an infusion of blood from young people.

While not naming any company, the FDA said “such treatments have no proven clinical benefits for the uses for which these clinics are advertising them and are potentially harmful.”

“There are reports of bad actors charging thousands of dollars for infusions that are unproven and not guided by evidence from adequate and well-controlled trials,” the agency added.

The agency discouraged people from participating in the practice unless it is part of a properly supervised clinical trial.

Specifically, the practice in question infuses blood plasma, the liquid component of blood.

The FDA referenced reports of young people’s blood plasma being touted as a treatment for conditions ranging from “normal aging and memory loss to serious diseases like dementia, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease or post-traumatic stress disorder.”