Divisions emerge over House drug price bills

Divisions emerge over House drug price bills
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Divisions are emerging in the House over what lawmakers hoped would be a bipartisan push to lower drug prices.

Drug pricing is a rare area where members of both parties think there is a chance for a deal this year. But as House Democrats took the first step on Wednesday to begin moving legislation forward, it was clear that even relatively small-scale drug pricing bills may not have a smooth path ahead.

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Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee raised objections to several of the bills at the hearing, accusing Democrats of refusing to negotiate with them on the legislation.

“We do want to lower the cost of prescription drugs, [but] we wish it were more inclusive,” said Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenOvernight Energy: EPA expands use of pesticide it considers 'highly toxic' to bees | House passes defense bill with measure targeting 'forever chemicals' | Five things to watch as Barry barrels through the Gulf House passes bill to crack down on toxic 'forever chemicals' Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (Ore.), the top Republican on the committee, about the process.

Democrats pointed out that many of the bills, which are aimed at increasing competition from cheaper generic drugs, already have support from some Republican lawmakers.

The bills are likely to pass the Democratic-controlled House. But getting a significant number of House Republicans on board for a strong vote would raise pressure on the GOP-controlled Senate to act on the issue.

Some Democrats are also hoping that winning support from President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE, who has railed against the high cost of drugs, will help win over more congressional Republicans.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSally Yates: Moral fiber of US being 'shredded by unapologetic racism' Al Green calls for additional security for House members after Trump rally #IStandWithPresTrump trends in response to #IStandWithIlhan MORE (D-Calif.) said last week that Trump “assured” her that he wants to work together on lowering drug prices.

But without the support of GOP congressional leaders, passing the bill with strong Republican support becomes a much harder task.

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The relatively small-scale measures considered Wednesday, many of which have at least some bipartisan support, are part of a House Democratic strategy to start with “low-hanging fruit” on drug prices before later moving on to bigger items like Medicare negotiating drug prices.

But even the low-hanging fruit is exposing divisions.

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Overnight Energy: USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move west | EPA hails Trump's work on reducing air pollution | Agency eyes reducing inspections of nuclear reactors Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp MORE (D-N.J.) said the measures considered Wednesday would increase competition in the marketplace from cheaper generic drugs. He tried to frame the issue with language that could appeal to GOP lawmakers.

“This is capitalism,” Pallone said. “That’s what we’re about here.”

Asked after the hearing whether there is a path forward for him to support the measures, Walden said “possibly” but noted that he wanted changes.

“I guess the question is the next step and whether the majority’s willing to make some improvements,” Walden told The Hill.

Those concerns were also amplified on Tuesday by Rep. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessHouse approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran GOP rep: Children are free to leave migrant camps at 'any time' MORE (R-Texas), the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health.

Burgess told The Hill that Democrats only shared the drug bills with him last week instead of bringing him in for negotiations.

“It could have been much better handled,” he said.

One of the highest-profile measures before the committee on Wednesday was the Creates Act. The bill would crack down on drug companies who game the system to delay competition from generic drugs.

Democrats noted that the bill already has Republican supporters, including Reps. David McKinleyDavid Bennett McKinleyBipartisan former EPA chiefs say Trump administration has abandoned agency's mission Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Divisions emerge over House drug price bills MORE (W.Va.), Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsHouse unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Trump praises GOP unity in opposing resolution condemning tweets House votes to condemn Trump for 'racist comments' MORE (Ga.) and Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsLawmakers request documents on DC councilman ethics investigation House Republicans dismissive of Paul Ryan's take on Trump The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (N.C.), the chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

In the Senate, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Senate approves long-delayed tax treaties in win for business The peculiar priorities of Adam Schiff MORE (R-Iowa), the chairman of the Finance Committee, also supports the measure.

“We actually have some diversity of opinion on our side,” Walden acknowledged, before joking, “and you should see it on some other topics.”

House Republicans at the hearing, though, raised concerns that the measures could harm innovation from drug companies or set off “frivolous lawsuits” from generic drug companies.

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonTrump primary challenger Bill Weld responds to rally chants: 'We are in a fight for the soul of the GOP' Democratic strategist on Trump tweets: 'He's feeding this fear and hate' Poll shows congresswomen attacked by Trump with weak favorability ratings MORE (R-Mich.), a former chairman of the committee, warned of the “unintended consequences of hampering innovation in medicine.”

The brand-name drug industry, a powerful force in Washington, has raised similar concerns and has long worked against many of the bills Democrats brought up for consideration Wednesday. 

Democrats pushed back on the criticism.

Rep. Anna EshooAnna Georges EshooOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Planned Parenthood ousts its president | Harris releases drug pricing plan | House Dem drug plan delayed until after recess Democratic chair: Medicare negotiating drug prices not moving before August House bill targets use of Pentagon networks for child pornography MORE (D-Calif.), the chairwoman of the Health Subcommittee, said “the sky is really not caving in” and noted that GOP lawmakers already support some of the bills.

But Republicans were insistent they wanted changes to the bill highlighting the complicated debate over drug prices.

Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Sanders: 'I'm only grumpy most of the time' Hillicon Valley: Hacker group targeted electric grid | House Democrats press CBP over facial recognition program | Senators offer bill to protect health data | Groups file FCC complaint over carriers' use of location data MORE (D-Vt.), one of the House’s fiercest critics of drug companies, expressed hope that a deal could be reached.

At a separate hearing on Tuesday, Welch secured commitments from Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to work with lawmakers on bills, including the Creates Act.

“It’s kind of exciting to be here because we’re actually on the threshold of doing something,” Welch said.