Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts'

Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts'
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A leading Democratic health group is launching a national ad campaign against vulnerable 2020 lawmakers for supporting what the group calls President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Warren warns Facebook may help reelect Trump 'and profit off of it' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' MORE's "blatant hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts."

The five-figure ad from Protect Our Care targets four senators and six House members and calls Trump a hypocrite for proposing massive cuts to Medicare and Medicaid, despite his repeated promises on the campaign trail to save those programs.

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“Trump is turning his back on seniors and families — proposing over two trillion dollars in cuts to Medicare and Medicaid,” the ad says. “Breaking his promise. Slashing our health care to the bone. And for what? Tax breaks for the wealthiest corporations.”

White House spokesman Judd Deere said the ad is wrong.

“The President is not cutting Medicare, he’s saving it," Deere said. "His budget makes necessary reforms that will lower out of pocket costs for patients and eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse which will preserve Medicare services for future generations.”

The ad will run on cable TV in Washington, D.C., and online. The group is targeting GOP Sens. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThe Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever Trump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing MORE (Ariz.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerBennet reintroduces bill to ban lawmakers from becoming lobbyists GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren MORE (Colo.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis says impeachment is 'a waste of resources' GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising MORE (N.C.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Maine), along with GOP Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena MORE (Pa.), Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisHouse panel pushes forward election security legislation GOP lawmaker: We're past point of doing separate infrastructure bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Association of Manufacturers - Trump, Congress draw battle lines on impeachment MORE (Ill.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonGOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine House passes bill to revamp medical screenings for migrants at border Energy efficiency cannot be a partisan issue for Washington MORE (Mich.), Jim HagedornJames Lee HagedornLawmakers toast Greta Van Susteren's new show Minnesota Democrat sets up rematch in competitive House race Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all MORE (Minn.), Don Bacon (Neb.) and John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHacker conference report details persistent vulnerabilities to US voting systems Hillicon Valley: Senate passes bill to boost cyber help for agencies, businesses | Watchdog warns Energy Department failing to protect grid | FTC sues Match for allegedly conning users Senate approves bill to boost cyber assistance for federal agencies, private sector MORE (N.Y.).

The ad is the latest example of Democratic attacks on the Trump administration’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2020, which begins Oct. 1. Lawmakers, including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' Mattis responds to Trump criticism: 'I guess I'm the Meryl Streep of generals' MORE (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' Mattis responds to Trump criticism: 'I guess I'm the Meryl Streep of generals' Democrats vow to push for repeal of other Trump rules after loss on power plant rollback MORE (D-N.Y.), have repeatedly slammed the administration, saying the cuts will hurt seniors and reduce their benefits.

"It is unbelievable the Trump budget calls for ... $850 billion cut in Medicare,” Schumer said after the White House released its funding request.

Democratic criticisms are seen by some as being overstated, at least on the Medicare front. A recent analysis by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget found that the vast majority of the Medicare cuts in Trump’s 2020 budget request are to payments to hospitals and doctors, not cuts to benefits for seniors on the program.

About 10 percent of the proposed Medicare cuts would affect seniors, the analysis found.

However, Trump’s proposed cuts would significantly affect Medicaid enrollees.

In that program, the administration proposed repealing ObamaCare’s expansion of the program and imposing cuts by placing a new cap on payments.