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Dem support grows for allowing public funds to pay for abortions

Support is growing among Democrats in Congress for allowing abortion coverage in publicly funded health programs.

House Democrats, who say they have a “pro-choice majority” for the first time in history, are vowing to end a long-standing ban of abortion coverage in Medicaid called the Hyde Amendment.

They also want to ensure that future government health care plans mandate abortion coverage.

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“I actually think we have the American people with us,” said Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Ocasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts Pocan won't seek another term as Progressive Caucus co-chair MORE (D-Wash.), a co-sponsor of a bill to eliminate the Hyde amendment and a sponsor of a Medicare for All bill that mandates abortion coverage.

“If you look at the power of women voters, Republicans and Democrats and independents, people want to be able to get their reproductive services, they don't want the government interfering with their decision about what they do with their body.”

The Hyde Amendment is attached annually to government spending bills, forbidding the use of public funds for the procedure in Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, and other health programs, except in limited circumstances.

While the amendment was introduced with bipartisan support in 1976, it has become a partisan issue in recent years, supported by Republicans but loathed by many Democrats. 

Opponents argue that it makes abortion inaccessible for low-income women, with a disproportionate impact on racial minorities.

Now, with Democrats in control of the House, opponents may have a chance to strip the amendment from an upcoming spending bill, which would set up a showdown with the GOP Senate.

“When they try to put these pieces of anti-choice legislation in bills, we can block it,” said Rep. Judy ChuJudy May ChuDHS opens probe into allegations at Georgia ICE facility Hispanic caucus report takes stock of accomplishments with eye toward 2021 Lawmakers of color blast Trump administration for reportedly instructing agencies to end anti-bias training MORE (D-Calif.), co-chair of the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus. 

“[Republicans] attempted many, many times over to defund Planned Parenthood, to put these restrictive anti-choice amendments into spending bills. We’re going to stop that.” 

A bill sponsored by Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDemocrats accuse Kushner of 'casual racism' over comments about Black Americans Ocasio-Cortez, progressives call on Senate not to confirm lobbyists or executives to future administration posts Democrats accuse tech companies of deceitful tactics in campaign against Calif. ballot measure MORE (D-Calif.) that would permanently repeal the Hyde Amendment had 137 supporters in the last Congress, and a Senate version was introduced for the first time two weeks ago by Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthTech CEOs clash with lawmakers in contentious hearing Ocasio-Cortez discusses family planning, possibly freezing her eggs Amy Coney Barrett's extreme views put women's rights in jeopardy MORE (D-Ill.). 

Neither bill will become law this year, but it shows the path the party hopes to take if it wins control of the White House and the Senate in 2020 or beyond.

“The issue of repealing Hyde was considered a far-left issue for a really long time. Something folks didn’t want to talk about on [Capitol Hill],” said Destiny Lopez, co-director of the All Above All Action Fund, a group focused on repealing the Hyde Amendment. 

“I think there’s been a series of external forces that have really made it possible for champions of reproductive justice to be more open on this issue, and they’ve really stepped up to lead in a vocal way. What we’re trying to do is really help people understand you can’t support abortion rights and not support repealing the Hyde Amendment,” she said.

Anti-abortion groups say Democrats are playing into their hands.

“The other most important issue to voters, when we go door to door, is the taxpayer funding of abortion,” said Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, a national group that works to elect anti-abortion politicians. 

“Our opinion is if that’s what Democrats want to talk about, keep talking about it. We want to make sure everyone knows what their position is, and we’ll win.” 

A range of high-profile Democrats support repealing the Hyde Amendment, including several 2020 presidential candidates such as Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOcasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' Internal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon MORE (N.Y.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris to travel to Texas Friday after polls show tie between Trump, Biden Harris more often the target of online misinformation than Pence: report Maya Rudolph says she loves playing Kamala Harris on SNL: 'Feels like being on the side of the good guys' MORE (Calif.). House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMnuchin says he learned of Pelosi's letter to him about stimulus talks 'in the press' On The Money: Trump makes a late pitch on the economy | US economy records record GDP gains after historic COVID-19 drop | Pelosi eyes big COVID-19 deal in lame duck Pelosi challenger calls delay on COVID-19 relief bill the 'privilege of politics' MORE (D-Calif.) has previously called for its repeal. The Democratic National Committee also backed a repeal of the Hyde Amendment in its 2016 platform. 

The idea of publicly funded abortion was once a more divisive issue among Democrats.

The Affordable Care Act almost didn’t pass because anti-abortion Democrats wanted restrictions on funding for plans that cover abortions. 

Today, there are only four House Democrats who identify as anti-abortion. 

Democrats are far from united on health care reform, but in the House, at least, there is near unanimity that health care legislation should cover abortion. 

“The current legislation for Medicare for All would cover abortion as an essential health care component, and I think that would as a necessity be in any legislation we would pass in the future,” said Rep. Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGette20 years later, the FDA must lift restrictions on medication abortion care Overnight Energy: Trump officials finalize plan to open up protected areas of Tongass to logging | Feds say offshore testing for oil can proceed despite drilling moratorium | Dems question EPA's postponement of inequality training Democrats question EPA postponement of environmental inequality training MORE (D-Colo.), co-chair of the Pro-Choice Caucus.