Surprise Justice move on ObamaCare puts GOP in bind

The Trump administration’s surprise call for the courts to strike down ObamaCare upended Capitol Hill on Tuesday, putting Republicans in a bind while giving Democrats new talking points on one of their favorite issues for the 2020 elections.

GOP lawmakers for the most part were reluctant to even talk about the Justice Department’s decision to call for all of ObamaCare to be struck down in a court filing.

ADVERTISEMENT

If the courts agree with the Justice Department, it would dramatically change the way health care is now delivered in the country, and insurance companies were among those criticizing the administration’s decision.

For the GOP, it shifted the political discussion from a more welcome storyline about the end of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s probe to health care — the issue Democrats see as helping them win back the House majority last fall.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySunday shows preview: 2020 Democrats jockey for top spot ahead of Nevada caucuses GOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans House GOP campaign arm mocks Democrats after stumbling upon internal info on races MORE (R-Calif.) deflected a question about the ObamaCare case at his leadership press conference and told reporters to call his office. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump declares war on hardworking Americans with new budget request The Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Overnight Health Care: Nevada union won't endorse before caucuses after 'Medicare for All' scrap | McConnell tees up votes on two abortion bills | CDC confirms 15th US coronavirus case MORE’s (R-Ky.) office had no immediate comment.

Democratic presidential candidates, for their part, quickly denounced the move.

“In 2020, we need to elect a president who will make health care a right,” Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisConway: Trump is 'toying with everybody' by attacking Bloomberg for stop-and-frisk comments The Hill's Campaign Report: New challenges for 2020 Dems in Nevada, South Carolina Beleaguered Biden turns to must-win South Carolina MORE (D-Calif.) wrote on Twitter.

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerBarr to testify before House Judiciary panel Graham won't call Barr to testify over Roger Stone sentencing recommendation Roger Stone witness alleges Trump targeted prosecutors in 'vile smear job' MORE (N.Y.) said the administration’s move ties an “anchor around the neck of every Republican for the next two years.”

Many Republican lawmakers declined to take a firm position on whether they support or oppose the Trump administration’s move, but their guarded responses illustrated the difficulty of the issue for them.

McCarthy’s spokesman issued a statement later on Tuesday that did not explicitly spell out McCarthy’s position on the legal case. It did call ObamaCare a “broken law” and said that Republicans have been clear that “Americans with preexisting conditions will be protected.”

But if the entire law were struck down, it would eliminate protections in the law that forbid insurance companies from denying insurance to people with pre-existing conditions.

Republicans facing tough races in 2020 dodged on whether they supported the Trump administration’s move.

“I do believe that the White House is in discussions with the majority here in the House, the Democrat majority, on prescription drug prices and some other things to lower that cost curve, so that's what I'm in favor of,” said Rep. Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Democrats seek to preempt Trump message on health care | E-cigarette executives set for grilling | Dems urge emergency funding for coronavirus Democrats slam GOP on drug prices in bilingual digital ads Overnight Health Care — Presented by Philip Morris International — Dems warn Trump against Medicaid block grants | Sanders under pressure on how to pay for 'Medicare for All' | China to allow in US health officials to study coronavirus MORE (R-Mo.), whose district the Cook Political Report rates as “lean Republican” for 2020.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTrump pick for Fed seat takes bipartisan fire Three Senate primaries to watch on Super Tuesday Coronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 MORE (R-N.C.), who is up for reelection next year, said “every time we say [repeal] we have to have a replace” but also did not give a firm position on whether he supports or opposes the administration’s move.

Ford O’Connell, a GOP strategist, said that because most legal experts do not think the anti-ObamaCare lawsuit will ultimately succeed, the issue will eventually be moot. At the same time, he acknowledged the administration’s filing creates a positive story for Democrats.

“Internally in their mind they’re breathing a sigh of relief,” O’Connell said of Democrats who can now talk about health care instead of Mueller’s findings.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsToward 'Super Tuesday' — momentum, money and delegates Trump unleashed: President moves with a free hand post-impeachment Senate Democrats pressure Trump to drop ObamaCare lawsuit MORE (R-Maine) was the rare Republican to directly say she was opposed to the administration’s move, calling it “very disappointing” and noting that the Department of Justice is supposed to defend “duly enacted laws, which the Affordable Care Act certainly was.”

The timing of the administration’s move seemed like incredible fortune for Democrats, many of whom were deflated by the Mueller news.

“At a time when all this Russia news came out and it’s not what voters are interested in, leave it to the Trump administration to turn it back to health care, which is why we’re in the majority,” said Rep. Scott PetersScott H. PetersVulnerable Democrats fret over surging Sanders Bloomberg lands Utah's lone Democratic rep as sixth congressional endorsement Fifth congressional Democrat backs Bloomberg in 2020 race MORE (D-Calif.).

Trump, during a private lunch at the Capitol on Tuesday with Senate Republicans, called for revisiting ObamaCare and coming up with something better, lawmakers said.

He did not offer details, other than saying that “whatever it is” should protect people with pre-existing conditions, Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsTrump pick for Fed seat takes bipartisan fire Senate drama surrounding Trump trial starts to fizzle Overnight Defense: Trump rolls back restrictions on land mines | Pentagon issues guidance on coronavirus | Impeachment trial nears end after Senate rejects witnesses MORE (R-S.D.) said while leaving the lunch.

With Democrats in control of the House, however, the chances of Congress agreeing on bipartisan ObamaCare legislation are essentially zero.

“He just mentioned in passing that there was litigation moving through the courts, but litigation takes a while and he wanted to see us revisit the subject,” said Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.).

A lower court judge invalidated ObamaCare in December in response to the lawsuit, brought by 20 GOP-led states.

But that judge is known as a staunch conservative, and legal experts in both parties predict that the lawsuit will not ultimately succeed, either at the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, where the case currently is, or at the Supreme Court.

The challengers argue that because Congress in 2017 repealed the financial penalty in the mandate for having coverage, the mandate can no longer be upheld as constitutional under Congress’s taxing power. They say that because the mandate should fall, the entire rest of the law should also be struck down.

Most legal experts say precedent shows that even if the mandate falls, there is no reason for courts to strike down the rest of the law, since Congress purposefully left the rest of ObamaCare in place while repealing the mandate penalty in the 2017 tax law.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynBooker, Cornyn introduce bill to fund school nutrition programs Three Senate primaries to watch on Super Tuesday Democrats seek to drive wedge between Trump, GOP on whistleblowers MORE (R-Texas) did not give a position on the case. “I support having the courts make the decision,” he said.

But he noted that the issue of health care is not going away.

“I expect we'll continue to have a conversation about health care into the indefinite future,” he said.