Sanders to roll out updated 'Medicare for all' proposal Wednesday

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersAndrew Cuomo: Biden has best chance at 'main goal' of beating Trump Poll: Buttigieg tops Harris, O'Rourke as momentum builds Buttigieg responds to accusation of pushing a 'hate hoax' about Pence MORE (I-Vt.) will roll out an updated version of his "Medicare for all" plan Wednesday on Capitol Hill. 

Sanders, who is again seeking the Democratic nomination for president, will unveil the bill alongside Senate co-sponsors, some of whom are also candidates for president. 

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Sanders last introduced the bill in 2017, with support from presidential candidates Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerHarris adds another to her list of endorsements in South Carolina The Hill's Morning Report - Dem candidates sell policy as smart politics 2020 Dems rebuke Trump on Iran, say they'd put US back in nuclear deal MORE (D-N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand pledges not to use 'stolen hacked' materials in 2020 campaign 2020 Dems rebuke Trump on Iran, say they'd put US back in nuclear deal Where 2020 Democratic candidates stand on impeachment MORE (D-N.Y.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJulián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Poll: Buttigieg tops Harris, O'Rourke as momentum builds Trump Jr. slams 2020 Dems as 'more concerned' about rights of murderers than legal gun owners MORE (D-Calif.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenJulián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Poll: Biden tops Sanders nationally Pete Buttigieg: 'God doesn't have a political party' MORE (D-Mass.) 

A spokesperson for Booker said he would again cosponsor the bill, but Gillibrand, Harris and Warren's offices did not reply to requests for comment.

Sanders's bill would largely eliminate private insurance and institute a single-payer system managed by the government. 

The updated version will also include long-term care, such as nursing homes, which is currently not covered by the Medicare program. 

Home and community based care which also be covered. 

Medicare for all, and its embrace by some 2020 candidates for president, has been highlighted by Republicans and President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE, who argue the Democratic Party is moving toward socialism. 

Harris faced criticism when she said earlier this year about private insurance "let's eliminate all of that. Let's move on." 

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharStudent slams Klobuchar for trying to classify pizza sauce as vegetable Pete Buttigieg: 'God doesn't have a political party' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem candidates sell policy as smart politics MORE (D-Minn.), who is also running for president, has not backed Medicare for all, and supports proposals that would create a Medicare public option, allowing individuals who aren't yet 65 to buy into the program.