Sanders unveils new Medicare for all bill with backing from other 2020 Dems

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPressure grows for breakthrough in Biden agenda talks Sanders, Manchin escalate fight over .5T spending bill Sanders blames media for Americans not knowing details of Biden spending plan MORE (I-Vt.) on Wednesday unveiled his revamped Medicare for all bill with the support of four Senate Democrats also running for president.

Sanders, who is again seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, rolled out the bill that would largely eliminate private insurance and institute a single-payer system managed by the government.

“The American people are increasingly clear: They want a health care system which guarantees health care to all Americans as a right," Sanders said Wednesday.

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Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenMisguided recusal rules lock valuable leaders out of the Pentagon Biden's soft touch with Manchin, Sinema frustrates Democrats Hillicon Valley — Presented by LookingGlass — Congress makes technology policy moves MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Energy & Environment — Biden makes return to pre-Trump national monument boundaries official Biden signs bill to help victims of 'Havana syndrome' Lawmakers using leadership PACs as 'slush funds' to live lavish lifestyles: report MORE (D-N.Y.), Cory BookerCory BookerDefense & National Security — Military starts giving guidance on COVID-19 vaccine refusals Senators preview bill to stop tech giants from prioritizing their own products Blinken pressed to fill empty post overseeing 'Havana syndrome' MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisAbrams targets Black churchgoers during campaign stops for McAuliffe in Virginia Replace Kamala Harris with William Shatner to get kids excited about space exploration Republicans would need a promotion to be 'paper tigers' MORE (D-Calif.) — all 2020 presidential candidates — again signed on to the bill after also supporting it in 2017. Gillibrand was the only one to attend Sanders' event Wednesday introducing the bill. 

The updated version will also include coverage for long-term care, such as nursing homes, which is currently not covered by the Medicare program. Home- and community-based care will also be covered.

The bill has 14 Senate co-sponsors in all, two fewer than it had in 2017.

Former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenFranken targets senators from both parties in new comedy tour Al Franken on another Senate run: 'I'm keeping my options open' Andrew Cuomo and the death of shame MORE (D-Minn.) had supported the bill two years ago, and Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDefense & National Security — Military starts giving guidance on COVID-19 vaccine refusals Blinken pressed to fill empty post overseeing 'Havana syndrome' Lawmakers call for more resources to support early cancer detection MORE (D-N.H.) decided not to co-sponsor the bill this year.

Shaheen said in a statement she now thinks there are faster ways to get to "Medicare for all" than Sanders’s proposal.

"While Republican leaders and President TrumpDonald TrumpRobert Gates says 'extreme polarization' is the greatest threat to US democracy Cassidy says he won't vote for Trump if he runs in 2024 Schiff says holding Bannon in criminal contempt 'a way of getting people's attention' MORE continue their efforts to takeaway health care that millions of Americans depend on, Medicare for All legislation has helped re-ignite an urgently needed debate about reaching universal health care coverage,” she said in a statement.

“In the near term, there are faster ways to reach universal coverage by building on the progress we've made through the Affordable Care Act, while addressing the high cost of care and medications.”