Sanders unveils new Medicare for all bill with backing from other 2020 Dems

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden says he won't legalize marijuana because it may be a 'gateway drug' Democrats seize on report of FedEx's Bernie Sanders tax bill to slam Trump's tax plan If we want to save earth, we need to change how we eat MORE (I-Vt.) on Wednesday unveiled his revamped Medicare for all bill with the support of four Senate Democrats also running for president.

Sanders, who is again seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, rolled out the bill that would largely eliminate private insurance and institute a single-payer system managed by the government.

“The American people are increasingly clear: They want a health care system which guarantees health care to all Americans as a right," Sanders said Wednesday.

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Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden says he won't legalize marijuana because it may be a 'gateway drug' Democrats seize on report of FedEx's Elizabeth Warren tax bill to slam Trump's tax plan Warren 'fully committed' to 'Medicare for All' MORE (D-Mass.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMaloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee She Should Run launches initiative to expand number of women in political process MORE (D-N.Y.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBiden says he won't legalize marijuana because it may be a 'gateway drug' New poll catapults Buttigieg to frontrunner position in Iowa Deval Patrick: a short runway, but potential to get airborne MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisIf we want to save earth, we need to change how we eat New poll shows four top-tier 2020 candidates in Iowa The Democratic race for president may not sort itself out MORE (D-Calif.) — all 2020 presidential candidates — again signed on to the bill after also supporting it in 2017. Gillibrand was the only one to attend Sanders' event Wednesday introducing the bill. 

The updated version will also include coverage for long-term care, such as nursing homes, which is currently not covered by the Medicare program. Home- and community-based care will also be covered.

The bill has 14 Senate co-sponsors in all, two fewer than it had in 2017.

Former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenTake Trump literally and seriously in Minnesota Ninth woman accuses Al Franken of inappropriate contact Al Franken to host SiriusXM radio show MORE (D-Minn.) had supported the bill two years ago, and Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOn The Money: US paid record .1B in tariffs in September | Dems ramp up oversight of 'opportunity zones' | Judge hints at letting House lawsuit over Trump tax returns proceed Overnight Energy: EPA watchdog slams agency chief after deputy fails to cooperate in probe | Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act | Bipartisan Senate climate caucus grows Overnight Defense: Trump, Erdogan confirm White House meeting | Public impeachment hearings set for next week | Top defense appropriator retiring MORE (D-N.H.) decided not to co-sponsor the bill this year.

Shaheen said in a statement she now thinks there are faster ways to get to "Medicare for all" than Sanders’s proposal.

"While Republican leaders and President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MORE continue their efforts to takeaway health care that millions of Americans depend on, Medicare for All legislation has helped re-ignite an urgently needed debate about reaching universal health care coverage,” she said in a statement.

“In the near term, there are faster ways to reach universal coverage by building on the progress we've made through the Affordable Care Act, while addressing the high cost of care and medications.”