Dem senator calls on McConnell to endorse bipartisan bill to raise smoking age to 21

Dem senator calls on McConnell to endorse bipartisan bill to raise smoking age to 21
© Greg Nash

The lead Democratic sponsor of bipartisan legislation to raise the minimum age to purchase tobacco to 21 called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellEverytown plans ad blitz on anniversary of House background check bill Kentucky state official says foreign adversaries 'routinely' scan election systems Don't let 'welfare for all' advocates derail administration's food stamp program reforms MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday to co-sponsor the bill rather than introduce his own.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzBooker, Merkley propose federal facial recognition moratorium Poll: Majority of Democrats say Electoral College delegates should cast ballots based on popular vote Democrats praise Romney for breaking with GOP on convicting Trump MORE (D-Hawaii) said the legislation, which is supported by many major public health groups, is the best way to ensure minors are protected from the harms of tobacco.

“We have all of the major tobacco cessation advocacy organizations supporting this legislation, and for one simple reason. It has no loopholes. It has no exceptions. There are no tricks. It is a clean piece of legislation,” Schatz said during a press conference. 

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“If Leader McConnell is interested in joining our effort, I think the cleanest way for him to do that would be for him to co-sponsor our bill. We look forward to seeing what he proposes if he proposes something,” Schatz said, adding that he thinks the bipartisan bill has the most momentum.

The bill is co-sponsored by Sens. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungRepublican Senate campaign arm hauled in over million in January The Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Overnight Defense: Senate votes to rein in Trump war powers on Iran | Pentagon shifting .8B to border wall | US, Taliban negotiate seven-day 'reduction in violence' MORE (R-Ind.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe Trump commutes sentence of ex-Illinois Gov. Blagojevich in rash of clemency orders The Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in MORE (D-Ill.) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDemocratic Senate campaign arm raised more than .5 million in January On the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump Trump looms as flashpoint in Alabama Senate battle MORE (R-Utah). The senators noted the bill is not comprehensive but stressed that its strength was in its minimalism.

“This is the most impactful, achievable public policy measure we can take,” Young said. “We’re seeking to build a broad coalition here, unapologetically.”

McConnell last month said he was planning to introduce a bill by the end of May that would raise the minimum age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21.

The announcement from McConnell, who represents a tobacco-producing state, was praised by industry giant Altria. The company also endorsed the bipartisan legislation from Schatz.

Public health groups have said any tobacco industry support makes them wary, but they don’t have a position on a potential McConnell bill because it hasn’t been introduced.

Tobacco companies are on the front line pushing for “Tobacco 21” legislation at the federal and state levels, mainly in an effort to stave off stronger regulations that could have disastrous effects on the industry.

Schatz said he is worried that the legislation could be weighed down by “loophole” provisions such as an exemption for members of the military. But he also cautioned against any provisions that would make it more comprehensive such as language banning certain tobacco flavors.

McConnell said his measure would include an exemption for members of the military, which is something anti-tobacco groups have opposed.

Young said he did not want to address any hypothetical legislation from McConnell and expressed confidence that his bill will get the required support of 60 senators needed to pass.