Warren introduces universal child care legislation

Warren introduces universal child care legislation
© Aaron Schwartz

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause | IMF estimates 6 percent global growth this year Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause and wipe out K per borrower Senate confirms Biden's Air Force secretary MORE (D-Mass.) and Rep. Deb HaalandDeb HaalandOvernight Energy: Manchin grills Haaland over Biden oil and gas review | Biden admin reportedly aims for 40 percent of drivers using EVs by 2030 |  Lack of DOD action may have caused 'preventable' PFAS risks Manchin grills Haaland over Biden oil and gas moratorium The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers describe horror of Jan. 6 in first committee hearing MORE (D-N.M.) introduced legislation Tuesday that would use federal funds to establish universal child care. 

The Universal Child Care and Early Learning Act seeks to combat the rise of rising child care costs in the face of stagnated wages with a focus on low-income families. The bicameral bill is cosponsored by Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate Democrats press administration on human rights abuses in Philippines Juan Williams: Biden's child tax credit is a game-changer Congress can make progress on fighting emissions with Zero Food Waste Act MORE (D-N.J.) — like Warren, a 2020 White House hopeful — and Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleySenate Democrats press administration on human rights abuses in Philippines Bipartisan congressional commission urges IOC to postpone, relocate Beijing Games Lawmakers urge Biden to make 'bold decisions' in nuclear review MORE (D-Ore.) and Democratic Reps. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeOvernight Defense: 6B Pentagon spending bill advances | Navy secretary nominee glides through hearing | Obstacles mount in Capitol security funding fight House panel advances 6B Pentagon bill on party-line vote House panel votes to repeal 2001, 2002 war authorizations MORE (Calif.), Mark PocanMark William PocanOvernight Defense: 6B Pentagon spending bill advances | Navy secretary nominee glides through hearing | Obstacles mount in Capitol security funding fight House panel advances 6B Pentagon bill on party-line vote Democratic tensions simmer in House between left, center MORE (Wis.), Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinFive takeaways from a bracing day of Jan. 6 testimony Police officer repeatedly calls Jan. 6 rioters 'terrorists'  Live coverage: House panel holds first hearing on Jan. 6 probe MORE (Md.), John Larson John Barry LarsonThe case for improving America's research and experimentation tax credit To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Democrats have a growing tax problem with SALT MORE (Conn.), Grace MengGrace MengHouse Democrats include immigration priorities as they forward DHS funding bill Here's what Congress is reading at the beach this summer House sends anti-Asian hate bill to Biden's desk MORE (N.Y.) and Stephen Horsford (Nev.), as well as Del. Eleanor Holmes NortonEleanor Holmes NortonDuckworth, Pressley introduce bill to provide paid family leave for those who experience miscarriage Congress must step up to fund the Howard University Hospital renovation Activists see momentum as three new states legalize marijuana MORE (D-D.C.).

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“As the wealthiest country in the world, access to affordable and high-quality child care and early education should be a right for all families rather than a privilege for only the rich,” Warren said in a statement. “Our legislation would give all parents the opportunity to choose the right child care and early learning opportunities for their kids.” 

“Childcare and early learning should not be a luxury that only people with money have access to, but right now that’s the status quo in this country,” Haaland echoed. “If we’re going to get serious about ending the cycle of poverty in New Mexico and the entire country, we need to invest in universal childcare and early learning.” 

The bill would mandate an unquantified federal investment to establish and support a network of locally-run Child Care and Early Learning Centers and Family Child Care Homes to ensure that every family can access affordable child care options from birth to school entry. It also provides free child care to families below 200 percent of the poverty line, while families with higher incomes would pay a subsidized fee on a sliding scale based on their income.

The network of Centers and Family Child Care Homes would provide pre-K education and offer mental and physical health, dental, and other services to children who need them.

The legislation also mandates that wages and benefits for child care workers be comparable to those of local public school teachers and that investments are made in worker training and professional development.

Warren and Haaland touted the endorsements of several national advocacy and social justice organizations.

“I applaud the work by Senator Warren and Representative Haaland to ensure that every child, regardless of background or social status, has equal access to the high-quality, affordable child care and education opportunities that lay the foundation for our children’s success in school and in life,” said Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association. 

Warren and Haaland noted that the introduction comes after the Annie E. Casey Foundation ranked New Mexico, Haaland’s home state, 50th in overall child wellbeing.

Warren has enjoyed a boost in 2020 primary polls after unveiling a slate of detailed policy proposals, largely focused on economic issues.