Poll finds Trump vulnerable on health care in battleground states

Poll finds Trump vulnerable on health care in battleground states
© Greg Nash

A majority of people polled in four major battleground states would not vote for a president who supports many of the policies being pursued by the Trump administration, according to a new survey.

The poll, conducted on behalf of pro-ObamaCare group Protect Our Care, found voters in Florida, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin would not consider voting for a presidential candidate who supports policies including eliminating protections for people with pre-existing conditions, cutting funding for Medicare or letting insurance companies stop covering the costs of prescription drugs. 

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Democrats won the House in 2018 running on health care and they are looking to recreate their success heading into the 2020 elections.

They think President TrumpDonald John TrumpJimmy Carter: 'I hope there's an age limit' on presidency White House fires DHS general counsel: report Trump to cap California trip with visit to the border MORE is vulnerable on health care and are looking to highlight the administration’s track record.

The survey, conducted by Democratic polling firm Public Policy Polling, showed 52 percent of respondents said they trust Democrats more on health care than Trump.

The poll also found that 72 percent of respondents would not vote for a candidate who supports health plans that would eliminate health care protections for people with pre-existing conditions, and 77 percent said they would not vote for a candidate who supported plans that would let insurance companies stop covering the costs of prescription drugs.

Democrats say those policies are a prime example of the Trump administration’s commitment to sabotage a functioning health care system. 

For example, the administration has made it easier for insurance companies to sell short-term plans. They aren’t required to cover the same benefits as ObamaCare plans, but they are often much cheaper. 

Democrats call them “junk” plans, but administration officials say short-term plans can help expand consumer choices for people who need it. 

The poll also found overwhelming support for allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices, and for stopping drug companies from “price gouging” on medications like insulin or EpiPens. 

The survey of 687 voters was conducted by phone from June 17-18. The margin of error is 3.7 percentage points.